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Qualität der Medikamentendistribution aus Sicht der Patientinnen und Patienten


Faisst, Karin; Schilling, Julian; Gutzwiller, Felix (2000). Qualität der Medikamentendistribution aus Sicht der Patientinnen und Patienten. Swiss Medical Weekly, 130:426-434.

Abstract

A cross-sectional survey investigated quality relevant aspects of the most common distribution channels (pharmacies, self-dispensing physicians) for prescription drugs in Switzerland. A self-administered questionnaire focusing on consumers' behaviour, perception and priorities regarding the process of dispensation of prescriptive medication was mailed to a random sample of 3000 patients, aged 18 years or older, with regular intake of prescriptive medication. Chi-square analysis was performed on 1058 responses. 60% of the respondents received their medication mainly or exclusively from pharmacies and 40% from self-dispensing physicians. In German-speaking Switzerland 53% of participants received their prescription drugs exclusively or mainly from self-dispensing physicians, compared to only 10% in the French-speaking area (p = 0.00). This distribution confirms the existing differences in regulation of self-dispensation in these regions. Most of the patients took 2-4 prescriptive drugs a day. The French Swiss received slightly more prescriptive medication than the German Swiss (p = 0.05). 45% of the participants, especially women and people using a pharmacy, reported additional, usually occasional over-the-counter medication. Provision of technical information (41%), friendliness (19%), and the availability of drugs (19%) were valued most important when receiving prescription drugs and 96% of the participants were satisfied with the service. In consequence, the participants were strongly bound to their source of drug supply. Some 80% received instructions for use there. However, only half were informed about the purpose of the medication, drugs' side effects, or possible drug interactions. Physicians provided such information more often than pharmacy staff. This observation may be attributable to the double role played by the self-dispensers, who provide medical care and at the same time hand out the drug. In conclusion, patients' satisfaction is achieved equally by both medication channels. However, there is a need to improve counselling to ensure excellence in the supply of drugs.

Abstract

A cross-sectional survey investigated quality relevant aspects of the most common distribution channels (pharmacies, self-dispensing physicians) for prescription drugs in Switzerland. A self-administered questionnaire focusing on consumers' behaviour, perception and priorities regarding the process of dispensation of prescriptive medication was mailed to a random sample of 3000 patients, aged 18 years or older, with regular intake of prescriptive medication. Chi-square analysis was performed on 1058 responses. 60% of the respondents received their medication mainly or exclusively from pharmacies and 40% from self-dispensing physicians. In German-speaking Switzerland 53% of participants received their prescription drugs exclusively or mainly from self-dispensing physicians, compared to only 10% in the French-speaking area (p = 0.00). This distribution confirms the existing differences in regulation of self-dispensation in these regions. Most of the patients took 2-4 prescriptive drugs a day. The French Swiss received slightly more prescriptive medication than the German Swiss (p = 0.05). 45% of the participants, especially women and people using a pharmacy, reported additional, usually occasional over-the-counter medication. Provision of technical information (41%), friendliness (19%), and the availability of drugs (19%) were valued most important when receiving prescription drugs and 96% of the participants were satisfied with the service. In consequence, the participants were strongly bound to their source of drug supply. Some 80% received instructions for use there. However, only half were informed about the purpose of the medication, drugs' side effects, or possible drug interactions. Physicians provided such information more often than pharmacy staff. This observation may be attributable to the double role played by the self-dispensers, who provide medical care and at the same time hand out the drug. In conclusion, patients' satisfaction is achieved equally by both medication channels. However, there is a need to improve counselling to ensure excellence in the supply of drugs.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Quality of dispensation of prescription medication from the patients' point of view
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2000
Deposited On:25 Jun 2014 15:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:56
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672

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