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L-lysine dose dependently delays gastric emptying and increases intestinal fluid volume in humans and rats


Baruffol, C; Jordi, J; Camargo, S; Radovic, T; Herzog, B; Fried, M; Schwizer, W; Verrey, F; Lutz, T A; Steingoetter, A (2014). L-lysine dose dependently delays gastric emptying and increases intestinal fluid volume in humans and rats. Neurogastroenterology and Motility, 26(7):999-1009.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Novel sensory inputs for the control of food intake and gastrointestinal (GI) function are of increasing interest due to the rapid increase in nutrition-related diseases. The essential amino acid L-lysine was demonstrated to have a selective impact on food intake, gastric emptying, and intestinal transit in rats, thus indicating a potential novel direct sensory input to assess dietary protein content and quality. The aim of this study was to assess translational aspects of this finding and to investigate the dose-dependent effect of L-lysine on human and rat GI function.
METHODS: L-lysine doses from 0-800 mg in rats and 0.5-7.5 g in humans were analyzed for their effect on gastric emptying and GI secretion. Human GI function was assessed non-invasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), rat data were acquired using standard lethal measurement methods. L-lysine dose dependently delayed gastric emptying and stimulated GI secretion in rats as reflected by residual phenol red content and increased gastric wet weight.
KEY RESULTS: The dose-dependent delay in gastric emptying observed in rats was confirmed in humans with an increase in halftime of gastric emptying of 4 min/g L-lysine, p < 0.01. Moreover, a dose-dependent increase in intestinal fluid accumulation was observed (0.4 mL/min/g L-lysine, p < 0.0001). No effect on alkaline tide, glucose concentration, hematocrit, or visceral sensations was detected.
CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: This translational study demonstrates comparable dose-dependent effects of intragastric L-lysine on GI function in humans and rats and suggests a broader role for individual amino acids in the control of GI motility and secretion in vivo.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Novel sensory inputs for the control of food intake and gastrointestinal (GI) function are of increasing interest due to the rapid increase in nutrition-related diseases. The essential amino acid L-lysine was demonstrated to have a selective impact on food intake, gastric emptying, and intestinal transit in rats, thus indicating a potential novel direct sensory input to assess dietary protein content and quality. The aim of this study was to assess translational aspects of this finding and to investigate the dose-dependent effect of L-lysine on human and rat GI function.
METHODS: L-lysine doses from 0-800 mg in rats and 0.5-7.5 g in humans were analyzed for their effect on gastric emptying and GI secretion. Human GI function was assessed non-invasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), rat data were acquired using standard lethal measurement methods. L-lysine dose dependently delayed gastric emptying and stimulated GI secretion in rats as reflected by residual phenol red content and increased gastric wet weight.
KEY RESULTS: The dose-dependent delay in gastric emptying observed in rats was confirmed in humans with an increase in halftime of gastric emptying of 4 min/g L-lysine, p < 0.01. Moreover, a dose-dependent increase in intestinal fluid accumulation was observed (0.4 mL/min/g L-lysine, p < 0.0001). No effect on alkaline tide, glucose concentration, hematocrit, or visceral sensations was detected.
CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: This translational study demonstrates comparable dose-dependent effects of intragastric L-lysine on GI function in humans and rats and suggests a broader role for individual amino acids in the control of GI motility and secretion in vivo.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:26 Jun 2014 13:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:56
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1350-1925
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/nmo.12354
PubMed ID:24890878

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