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Patient activation and disability in upper extremity illness - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Gruber, Jillian S; Hageman, Michiel; Neuhaus, Valentin; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Jupiter, Jesse B; Ring, David (2014). Patient activation and disability in upper extremity illness. Journal of Hand Surgery, 39(7):1378-1383.e3.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine if higher patient activation (active involvement in one's health care) correlates with fewer symptoms and less disability in patients with hand and upper extremity illness.
METHODS: We enrolled 112 patients presenting to our department for the first time. Before meeting with the surgeon, subjects completed a demographics questionnaire, the short form Patient Activation Measure; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand; Patient Health Questionnaire-2; Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire; and an 11-point ordinal rating of pain intensity. We contacted patients 1 to 2 months after enrollment. Seventy-five subjects completed the second evaluation over the telephone, on a secure data-collection web site, or in an office visit, which included the Patient Activation Measure; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand; numerical rating scale for pain; and ordinal rating of treatment satisfaction.
RESULTS: Patient activation at enrollment correlated with disability, pain intensity, and satisfaction with treatment but was only retained in the multivariable model for pain intensity. Pain self-efficacy at enrollment was the factor that best accounted for variation in disability, pain, and satisfaction with treatment.
CONCLUSIONS: Given the consistent relationship between effective coping strategies (eg, pain self-efficacy) and symptoms and disability and the independent influence of patient activation on pain intensity in this study, future research should address the ability of interventions that improve self-efficacy and patient activation to improve upper extremity health.
TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic II.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine if higher patient activation (active involvement in one's health care) correlates with fewer symptoms and less disability in patients with hand and upper extremity illness.
METHODS: We enrolled 112 patients presenting to our department for the first time. Before meeting with the surgeon, subjects completed a demographics questionnaire, the short form Patient Activation Measure; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand; Patient Health Questionnaire-2; Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire; and an 11-point ordinal rating of pain intensity. We contacted patients 1 to 2 months after enrollment. Seventy-five subjects completed the second evaluation over the telephone, on a secure data-collection web site, or in an office visit, which included the Patient Activation Measure; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand; numerical rating scale for pain; and ordinal rating of treatment satisfaction.
RESULTS: Patient activation at enrollment correlated with disability, pain intensity, and satisfaction with treatment but was only retained in the multivariable model for pain intensity. Pain self-efficacy at enrollment was the factor that best accounted for variation in disability, pain, and satisfaction with treatment.
CONCLUSIONS: Given the consistent relationship between effective coping strategies (eg, pain self-efficacy) and symptoms and disability and the independent influence of patient activation on pain intensity in this study, future research should address the ability of interventions that improve self-efficacy and patient activation to improve upper extremity health.
TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic II.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:02 Jul 2014 15:50
Last Modified:05 Jan 2017 14:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0363-5023
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2014.03.042
PubMed ID:24861382

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