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Velocity drop in anconeus epitrochlearis-associated cubital tunnel syndrome


Cheriyan, Thomas; Neuhaus, Valentin; Mudgal, Chaitanya S (2014). Velocity drop in anconeus epitrochlearis-associated cubital tunnel syndrome. American Journal of Orthopedics, 43(5):227-229.

Abstract

The anconeus epitrochlearis (AE) muscle is a common anatomical variation in the cubital tunnel retinaculum of the elbow with an incidence of up to 28%; it is one cause of compressive ulnar neuropathy. In this study, we report the significance of preoperative recognition of AE-associated cubital tunnel syndrome, based on the grade of velocity drop of the compressed ulnar nerve in electrophysiological studies. Twenty-two cases with idiopathic cubital tunnel compression (CTC) were retrospectively analyzed; AE was present in 6 cases. Velocity drop of the ulnar nerve was calculated by dividing the difference in velocity (m/s) by distance (cm); the results were classified into the following grades: + (0-2.99 m/s per cm) and ++ (< 3.00 m/s per cm). Categorical data were compared using Fisher's exact test; the Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine statistical significance of ordinal data. In patients with AE-associated CTC, 3 of the 6 (50%) cases had grade ++ velocity drop. In comparison, only 1 patient of the 16 non-AE cases (6%) had grade ++ velocity drop (P = .046). Preoperative nerve velocity conduction studies that show grade ++ velocity drop (< 3.00 m/s per cm) in ulnar nerve are highly suggestive of the presence of AE.

Abstract

The anconeus epitrochlearis (AE) muscle is a common anatomical variation in the cubital tunnel retinaculum of the elbow with an incidence of up to 28%; it is one cause of compressive ulnar neuropathy. In this study, we report the significance of preoperative recognition of AE-associated cubital tunnel syndrome, based on the grade of velocity drop of the compressed ulnar nerve in electrophysiological studies. Twenty-two cases with idiopathic cubital tunnel compression (CTC) were retrospectively analyzed; AE was present in 6 cases. Velocity drop of the ulnar nerve was calculated by dividing the difference in velocity (m/s) by distance (cm); the results were classified into the following grades: + (0-2.99 m/s per cm) and ++ (< 3.00 m/s per cm). Categorical data were compared using Fisher's exact test; the Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine statistical significance of ordinal data. In patients with AE-associated CTC, 3 of the 6 (50%) cases had grade ++ velocity drop. In comparison, only 1 patient of the 16 non-AE cases (6%) had grade ++ velocity drop (P = .046). Preoperative nerve velocity conduction studies that show grade ++ velocity drop (< 3.00 m/s per cm) in ulnar nerve are highly suggestive of the presence of AE.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:May 2014
Deposited On:02 Jul 2014 15:51
Last Modified:23 Jan 2017 08:13
Publisher:Quadrant HealthCom
ISSN:1078-4519
PubMed ID:24839629

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