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A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet


Dermauw, Veronique; De Cuyper, A; Duchateau, L; Waseyehon, A; Dierenfeld, E; Clauss, Marcus; Peters, I R; Du Laing, G; Janssens, G P J (2014). A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet. Journal of Animal Science, 92:3007-3017.

Abstract

Copper deficiency is a commonly diagnosed problem in cattle around the globe. In Jimma, Ethiopia, 8 zebu (Bos indicus) and 8 zebu × Holstein Friesian cross (Bos taurus × Bos indicus) heifers were used in an 11-wk study to investigate breed type differences and effects of Cu deficiency on concentrations of trace elements in plasma and edible tissues as well as mRNA expression of Cu-related genes. Heifers were fed a grass diet (6.4 ± 0.2 [SEM] mg Cu/kg DM) supplemented with 1 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 1 to 4 and 2 mg Mo/ kg DM in wk 5 to 11, with blood samples collected every 2 wk and tissue collection postmortem. Plasma, liver, kidney, and semitendinosus and cardiac muscle were analyzed for Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, Mo, Co, and Mn. Expression of mRNA Cu-related genes was measured in aorta (lysyl oxidase [LOX]), liver (Cu transporting β-polypeptide [Atp7b], Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase [CCS], cytochrome c oxidase assembly homolog 17 [Cox17], Cu transporter 1 homolog [Ctr1], and superoxide dismutase 1 [Sod1]), and duodenum (diamine oxidase [DAO] and metallo-thionein-1A [Mt1a]) as well as the Se-related glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1). Zebu cattle maintained initial plasma Cu concentrations just below the threshold value for deficiency, whereas crossbred cattle gradually became severely Cu deficient over time (P < 0.001). In contrast, plasma Zn and Co were greater in zebu cattle at the onset of the trial but became similar to crossbred cattle towards the end of the trial (P < 0.001). Liver Cu (P = 0.002) and Fe (P ≤ 0.001), kidney Se (P < 0.001), and kidney and cardiac muscle Co (P ≤ 0.001) concentrations were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. Increased hepatic mRNA expression of the Cu regulatory genes Atp7b, Ctr1 (P = 0.02), CCS (P = 0.03), and Cox17 (P = 0.009) and Cu-related Sod1 (P = 0.001) as well as the Se-related Gpx1 (P ≤ 0.001) were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. However, duodenal mRNA expression of DAO (P = 0.8) and Mt1a (P = 0.2) and aortic expression of LOX (P = 0.8) were not different. Both the differences in Cu status indices (plasma and liver concentrations) and hepatic mRNA expression of Cu regulatory genes point to the possibility of a more efficient use of dietary Cu in B. indicus as compared to B. taurus × B. indicus cattle resulting in greater sensitivity to Cu deficiency in B. taurus crossbred cattle.

Abstract

Copper deficiency is a commonly diagnosed problem in cattle around the globe. In Jimma, Ethiopia, 8 zebu (Bos indicus) and 8 zebu × Holstein Friesian cross (Bos taurus × Bos indicus) heifers were used in an 11-wk study to investigate breed type differences and effects of Cu deficiency on concentrations of trace elements in plasma and edible tissues as well as mRNA expression of Cu-related genes. Heifers were fed a grass diet (6.4 ± 0.2 [SEM] mg Cu/kg DM) supplemented with 1 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 1 to 4 and 2 mg Mo/ kg DM in wk 5 to 11, with blood samples collected every 2 wk and tissue collection postmortem. Plasma, liver, kidney, and semitendinosus and cardiac muscle were analyzed for Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, Mo, Co, and Mn. Expression of mRNA Cu-related genes was measured in aorta (lysyl oxidase [LOX]), liver (Cu transporting β-polypeptide [Atp7b], Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase [CCS], cytochrome c oxidase assembly homolog 17 [Cox17], Cu transporter 1 homolog [Ctr1], and superoxide dismutase 1 [Sod1]), and duodenum (diamine oxidase [DAO] and metallo-thionein-1A [Mt1a]) as well as the Se-related glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1). Zebu cattle maintained initial plasma Cu concentrations just below the threshold value for deficiency, whereas crossbred cattle gradually became severely Cu deficient over time (P < 0.001). In contrast, plasma Zn and Co were greater in zebu cattle at the onset of the trial but became similar to crossbred cattle towards the end of the trial (P < 0.001). Liver Cu (P = 0.002) and Fe (P ≤ 0.001), kidney Se (P < 0.001), and kidney and cardiac muscle Co (P ≤ 0.001) concentrations were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. Increased hepatic mRNA expression of the Cu regulatory genes Atp7b, Ctr1 (P = 0.02), CCS (P = 0.03), and Cox17 (P = 0.009) and Cu-related Sod1 (P = 0.001) as well as the Se-related Gpx1 (P ≤ 0.001) were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. However, duodenal mRNA expression of DAO (P = 0.8) and Mt1a (P = 0.2) and aortic expression of LOX (P = 0.8) were not different. Both the differences in Cu status indices (plasma and liver concentrations) and hepatic mRNA expression of Cu regulatory genes point to the possibility of a more efficient use of dietary Cu in B. indicus as compared to B. taurus × B. indicus cattle resulting in greater sensitivity to Cu deficiency in B. taurus crossbred cattle.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:09 Jul 2014 14:18
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 21:21
Publisher:American Society of Animal Science
ISSN:0021-8812
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2527/jas2013-6979

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