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Misinformation, disinformation, and violent conflict: from Iraq and the "War on Terror" to future threats to peace


Lewandowsky, Stephan; Stritzke, Werner G K; Freund, Alexandra M; Oberauer, Klaus; Krueger, Joachim I (2013). Misinformation, disinformation, and violent conflict: from Iraq and the "War on Terror" to future threats to peace. American Psychologist, 68(7):487-501.

Abstract

The dissemination and control of information are indispensable ingredients of violent conflict, with all parties involved in a conflict or at war seeking to frame the discussion on their own terms. Those attempts at information control often involve the dissemination of misinformation or disinformation (i.e., information that is incorrect by accident or intent, respectively). We review the way in which misinformation can facilitate violent conflicts and, conversely, how the successful refutation of misinformation can contribute to peace. We illustrate the relevant cognitive principles by examining two case studies. The first, a retrospective case, involves the Iraq War of 2003 and the "War on Terror." The second, a prospective case, points to likely future sources of conflict arising from climate change and its likely consequences.

Abstract

The dissemination and control of information are indispensable ingredients of violent conflict, with all parties involved in a conflict or at war seeking to frame the discussion on their own terms. Those attempts at information control often involve the dissemination of misinformation or disinformation (i.e., information that is incorrect by accident or intent, respectively). We review the way in which misinformation can facilitate violent conflicts and, conversely, how the successful refutation of misinformation can contribute to peace. We illustrate the relevant cognitive principles by examining two case studies. The first, a retrospective case, involves the Iraq War of 2003 and the "War on Terror." The second, a prospective case, points to likely future sources of conflict arising from climate change and its likely consequences.

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16 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2013
Deposited On:04 Jul 2014 14:04
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 06:19
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0003-066X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/a0034515
PubMed ID:24128313

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