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Soft-tissue imprints in fossil and recent cephalopod septa and septum formation


Klug, C; Meyer, E P; Richter, U; Korn, D (2008). Soft-tissue imprints in fossil and recent cephalopod septa and septum formation. Lethaia, 41(4):477-492.

Abstract

Several soft-tissue imprints and attachment sites have been discovered on the inside of the shell wall and on the apertural side of the septum of various fossil and Recent ectocochleate cephalopods. In addition to the scars of the cephalic retractors, steinkerns of the body chambers of bactritoids and some ammonoids from the Moroccan and the German Emsian (Early Devonian) display various kinds of striations; some of these striations are restricted to the mural part of the septum, some start at the suture and terminate at the anterior limit of the annular elevation. Several of these features were also discovered in specimens of Mesozoic and Recent nautilids. These structures are here interpreted as imprints of muscle fibre bundles of the posterior and especially the septal mantle, blood vessels as well as the septal furrow. Most of these structures were not found in ammonoids younger than Middle Devonian. We suggest that newly formed, not yet mineralized (or only slightly), septa were more tightly stayed between the more numerous lobes and saddles in more strongly folded septa of more derived ammonoids and that the higher tension in these septa did not permit soft-parts to leave imprints on the organic preseptum. It is conceivable that this permitted more derived ammonoids to replace the chamber liquid faster by gas and consequently, new chambers could be used earlier than in other ectocochleate cephalopods, perhaps this process began even prior to mineralization. This would have allowed faster growth rates in derived ammonoids.

Abstract

Several soft-tissue imprints and attachment sites have been discovered on the inside of the shell wall and on the apertural side of the septum of various fossil and Recent ectocochleate cephalopods. In addition to the scars of the cephalic retractors, steinkerns of the body chambers of bactritoids and some ammonoids from the Moroccan and the German Emsian (Early Devonian) display various kinds of striations; some of these striations are restricted to the mural part of the septum, some start at the suture and terminate at the anterior limit of the annular elevation. Several of these features were also discovered in specimens of Mesozoic and Recent nautilids. These structures are here interpreted as imprints of muscle fibre bundles of the posterior and especially the septal mantle, blood vessels as well as the septal furrow. Most of these structures were not found in ammonoids younger than Middle Devonian. We suggest that newly formed, not yet mineralized (or only slightly), septa were more tightly stayed between the more numerous lobes and saddles in more strongly folded septa of more derived ammonoids and that the higher tension in these septa did not permit soft-parts to leave imprints on the organic preseptum. It is conceivable that this permitted more derived ammonoids to replace the chamber liquid faster by gas and consequently, new chambers could be used earlier than in other ectocochleate cephalopods, perhaps this process began even prior to mineralization. This would have allowed faster growth rates in derived ammonoids.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ammonoidea • Arteries • Bactritoidea • Early Devonian • growth • Nautiloidea • soft-tissue attachment
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:10 Feb 2009 15:44
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 10:17
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0024-1164
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1502-3931.2008.00100.x

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