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Attributional styles and stress-related atherogenic plasma lipid reactivity in essential hypertension


Kuebler, Ulrike; Trachsel, Manuel; von Känel, Roland; Abbruzzese, Elvira; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, Petra H (2014). Attributional styles and stress-related atherogenic plasma lipid reactivity in essential hypertension. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 77(1):51-56.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hypertension and an atherogenic lipid profile are known risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). Hypertensives show greater changes in atherogenic plasma lipids to acute stress than normotensives. In this study, we investigated whether attribution of failure is associated with lipid stress reactivity in hypertensive compared with normotensive men.

METHODS: 18 normotensive and 17 hypertensive men (mean±SEM; 45±2.2years) underwent an acute standardized psychosocial stress task that can be viewed as a situation of experimentally induced failure. We assessed external-stable (ES), external-variable (EV), internal-stable (IS), and internal-variable (IV) attribution of failure and psychological control variables (i.e. extent of depression and neuroticism). Moreover, total cholesterol (TC), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and norepinephrine were measured immediately before and several times after stress.

RESULTS: ES moderated TC- and LDL-C-stress reactivity in hypertensives as compared to normotensives (interaction mean arterial pressure [MAP]-by-ES for TC: F=3.71, p=.015; for LDL-C: F=3.61, p=.016). TC and LDL-C levels were highest in hypertensives with low ES immediately after stress (p≤.039). In contrast, hypertensives with high ES did not differ from normotensives in TC and LDL-C immediately after stress (p's>.28). Controlling for norepinephrine, depression, and neuroticism in addition to age and BMI did not significantly change results. There were no significant associations between lipid baseline levels or aggregated lipid secretion and IS, IV, or EV (p's>.23).

CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that ES may independently protect from elevated lipid stress reactivity in hypertensive individuals. ES thus might be a protective factor against CHD in hypertension.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hypertension and an atherogenic lipid profile are known risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). Hypertensives show greater changes in atherogenic plasma lipids to acute stress than normotensives. In this study, we investigated whether attribution of failure is associated with lipid stress reactivity in hypertensive compared with normotensive men.

METHODS: 18 normotensive and 17 hypertensive men (mean±SEM; 45±2.2years) underwent an acute standardized psychosocial stress task that can be viewed as a situation of experimentally induced failure. We assessed external-stable (ES), external-variable (EV), internal-stable (IS), and internal-variable (IV) attribution of failure and psychological control variables (i.e. extent of depression and neuroticism). Moreover, total cholesterol (TC), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and norepinephrine were measured immediately before and several times after stress.

RESULTS: ES moderated TC- and LDL-C-stress reactivity in hypertensives as compared to normotensives (interaction mean arterial pressure [MAP]-by-ES for TC: F=3.71, p=.015; for LDL-C: F=3.61, p=.016). TC and LDL-C levels were highest in hypertensives with low ES immediately after stress (p≤.039). In contrast, hypertensives with high ES did not differ from normotensives in TC and LDL-C immediately after stress (p's>.28). Controlling for norepinephrine, depression, and neuroticism in addition to age and BMI did not significantly change results. There were no significant associations between lipid baseline levels or aggregated lipid secretion and IS, IV, or EV (p's>.23).

CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that ES may independently protect from elevated lipid stress reactivity in hypertensive individuals. ES thus might be a protective factor against CHD in hypertension.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychotherapeutisches Zentrum des Psychologischen Instituts UZH
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:08 Jul 2014 10:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:57
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3999
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.04.004
PubMed ID:24913342

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