Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Brainstem cavernoma surgery with the support of pre- and postoperative diffusion tensor imaging: initial experiences and clinical course of 23 patients


Ulrich, Nils H; Kockro, Ralf A; Bellut, David; Amaxopoulou, Christina; Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Sarnthein, Johannes; Kollias, Spyros S; Bertalanffy, Helmut (2014). Brainstem cavernoma surgery with the support of pre- and postoperative diffusion tensor imaging: initial experiences and clinical course of 23 patients. Neurosurgical Review, 37(3):481-492.

Abstract

The spatial complexity of highly vulnerable structures makes surgical resection of brainstem cavernomas (BSC) a challenging procedure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for the visualization of white matter tracts and enables a better understanding of the anatomical location of corticospinal and sensory tracts before and after surgery.We investigated the feasibility and clinical usefulness of DTI-based fiber tractography in patients with BSC.Pre- and postoperative DTI visualization of corticospinal and sensory tracts were retrospectively analyzed in 23 individuals with BSC. Preoperative and postoperative DTI-fiber accuracy were associated to the neurological findings. Preoperatively, the corticospinal tracts were visualized in 90 % of the cases and the sensory tracts were visualized in 74 % of the cases. Postoperatively, the corticospinal tracts were visualized in 97 % of the cases and the sensory tracts could be visualized in 80 % of the cases. In all cases, the BSC had caused displacement, thinning, or interruption of the fiber tracts to various degrees. Tract visualization was associated with pre- and postoperative neurological findings. Postoperative damage of the corticospinal tracts was observed in two patients. On follow-up, the Patzold Rating (PR) improved in 19 out of 23 patients (83 %, p = 0.0002).This study confirms that DTI tractography allows accurate and detailed white matter tract visualization in the brainstem, even when an intraaxial lesion affects this structure. Furthermore, visualizing the tracts adjacent to the lesion adds to our understanding of the distorted intrinsic brainstem anatomy and it may assists in planning the surgical approach in specific cases.

Abstract

The spatial complexity of highly vulnerable structures makes surgical resection of brainstem cavernomas (BSC) a challenging procedure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for the visualization of white matter tracts and enables a better understanding of the anatomical location of corticospinal and sensory tracts before and after surgery.We investigated the feasibility and clinical usefulness of DTI-based fiber tractography in patients with BSC.Pre- and postoperative DTI visualization of corticospinal and sensory tracts were retrospectively analyzed in 23 individuals with BSC. Preoperative and postoperative DTI-fiber accuracy were associated to the neurological findings. Preoperatively, the corticospinal tracts were visualized in 90 % of the cases and the sensory tracts were visualized in 74 % of the cases. Postoperatively, the corticospinal tracts were visualized in 97 % of the cases and the sensory tracts could be visualized in 80 % of the cases. In all cases, the BSC had caused displacement, thinning, or interruption of the fiber tracts to various degrees. Tract visualization was associated with pre- and postoperative neurological findings. Postoperative damage of the corticospinal tracts was observed in two patients. On follow-up, the Patzold Rating (PR) improved in 19 out of 23 patients (83 %, p = 0.0002).This study confirms that DTI tractography allows accurate and detailed white matter tract visualization in the brainstem, even when an intraaxial lesion affects this structure. Furthermore, visualizing the tracts adjacent to the lesion adds to our understanding of the distorted intrinsic brainstem anatomy and it may assists in planning the surgical approach in specific cases.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
13 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
17 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:09 Jul 2014 14:20
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 21:22
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0344-5607
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10143-014-0550-x
PubMed ID:24801720

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library