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A Protein Kinase A-Independent Pathway Controlling Aquaporin 2 Trafficking as a Possible Cause for the Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis Associated with Polycystic Kidney Disease 1 Haploinsufficiency


Tamma, Grazia; Lasorsa, Domenica; Trimpert, Christiane; Ranieri, Marianna; Di Mise, Annarita; Mola, Maria Grazia; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Devuyst, Olivier; Svelto, Maria; Deen, Peter M T; Valenti, Giovanna (2014). A Protein Kinase A-Independent Pathway Controlling Aquaporin 2 Trafficking as a Possible Cause for the Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis Associated with Polycystic Kidney Disease 1 Haploinsufficiency. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), 25(10):2241-2253.

Abstract

Renal water reabsorption is controlled by arginine vasopressin (AVP), which binds to V2 receptors, resulting in protein kinase A (PKA) activation, phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at serine 256, and translocation of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. However, AVP also causes dephosphorylation of AQP2 at S261. Recent studies showed that cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) can phosphorylate AQP2 peptides at S261 in vitro. We investigated the possible role of cdks in the phosphorylation of AQP2 and identified a new PKA-independent pathway regulating AQP2 trafficking. In ex vivo kidney slices and MDCK-AQP2 cells, R-roscovitine, a specific inhibitor of cdks, increased pS256 levels and decreased pS261 levels. The changes in AQP2 phosphorylation status were paralleled by increases in cell surface expression of AQP2 and osmotic water permeability in the absence of forskolin stimulation. R-Roscovitine did not alter cAMP-dependent PKA activity but specifically reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression and activity in MDCK cells. Notably, we found reduced PP2A expression and activity and reduced pS261 levels in Pkd1(+/-) mice displaying a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis with high levels of pS256, despite unchanged AVP and cAMP. Similar to previous findings in Pkd1(+/-) mice, R-roscovitine treatment caused a significant decrease in intracellular calcium in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that reduced activity of PP2A, secondary to reduced intracellular Ca(2+) levels, promotes AQP2 trafficking independent of the AVP-PKA axis. This pathway may be relevant for explaining pathologic states characterized by inappropriate AVP secretion and positive water balance.

Abstract

Renal water reabsorption is controlled by arginine vasopressin (AVP), which binds to V2 receptors, resulting in protein kinase A (PKA) activation, phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at serine 256, and translocation of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. However, AVP also causes dephosphorylation of AQP2 at S261. Recent studies showed that cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) can phosphorylate AQP2 peptides at S261 in vitro. We investigated the possible role of cdks in the phosphorylation of AQP2 and identified a new PKA-independent pathway regulating AQP2 trafficking. In ex vivo kidney slices and MDCK-AQP2 cells, R-roscovitine, a specific inhibitor of cdks, increased pS256 levels and decreased pS261 levels. The changes in AQP2 phosphorylation status were paralleled by increases in cell surface expression of AQP2 and osmotic water permeability in the absence of forskolin stimulation. R-Roscovitine did not alter cAMP-dependent PKA activity but specifically reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression and activity in MDCK cells. Notably, we found reduced PP2A expression and activity and reduced pS261 levels in Pkd1(+/-) mice displaying a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis with high levels of pS256, despite unchanged AVP and cAMP. Similar to previous findings in Pkd1(+/-) mice, R-roscovitine treatment caused a significant decrease in intracellular calcium in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that reduced activity of PP2A, secondary to reduced intracellular Ca(2+) levels, promotes AQP2 trafficking independent of the AVP-PKA axis. This pathway may be relevant for explaining pathologic states characterized by inappropriate AVP secretion and positive water balance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:09 Jul 2014 15:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:57
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1046-6673
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2013111234
PubMed ID:24700872

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