Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Fronto-temporal interactions during overt verbal initiation and suppression


Allen, P; Mechelli, A; Stephan, K E; Day, F; Dalton, J; Williams, S; McGuire, P K (2008). Fronto-temporal interactions during overt verbal initiation and suppression. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20(9):1656-1669.

Abstract

The Hayling Sentence Completion Task (HSCT) is known to
activate left hemisphere frontal and temporal language regions. However, the effective connectivity between frontal and temporal language regions associated with the task has yet to be examined. The aims of the study were to examine activation and effective connectivity during the HSCT using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm in which participants made overt verbal responses. We predicted that producing an incongruent response (response suppression), compared to a congruent one (response initiation), would be associated with greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex and an increase
in the effective connectivity between temporal and frontal
regions. Fifteen participants were scanned while completing
80 sentence stems. The congruency and constraint of sentences varied across trials. Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) and Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) were used to compare a set of alternative DCMs of fronto-temporal connectivity. The HSCT activated regions in the left temporal and prefrontal cortices, and the cuneus. Response suppression was associated with greater activation in the left middle and orbital frontal gyri and the bilateral precuneus than response initiation. Left middle temporal and frontal regions identified by the conventional fMRI
analyses were entered into the DCM analysis. Using a systematic BMS procedure, the optimal DCM showed that the connection from the left middle temporal gyrus, which was driven by verbal stimuli per se, was significantly increased in strength during response suppression compared to initiation. Greater effective connectivity between left temporal and prefrontal regions during response suppression may reflect the transfer of information from posterior temporal regions where semantic and lexical information
is stored to prefrontal regions where it is manipulated
in preparation for an appropriate response.

Abstract

The Hayling Sentence Completion Task (HSCT) is known to
activate left hemisphere frontal and temporal language regions. However, the effective connectivity between frontal and temporal language regions associated with the task has yet to be examined. The aims of the study were to examine activation and effective connectivity during the HSCT using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm in which participants made overt verbal responses. We predicted that producing an incongruent response (response suppression), compared to a congruent one (response initiation), would be associated with greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex and an increase
in the effective connectivity between temporal and frontal
regions. Fifteen participants were scanned while completing
80 sentence stems. The congruency and constraint of sentences varied across trials. Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) and Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) were used to compare a set of alternative DCMs of fronto-temporal connectivity. The HSCT activated regions in the left temporal and prefrontal cortices, and the cuneus. Response suppression was associated with greater activation in the left middle and orbital frontal gyri and the bilateral precuneus than response initiation. Left middle temporal and frontal regions identified by the conventional fMRI
analyses were entered into the DCM analysis. Using a systematic BMS procedure, the optimal DCM showed that the connection from the left middle temporal gyrus, which was driven by verbal stimuli per se, was significantly increased in strength during response suppression compared to initiation. Greater effective connectivity between left temporal and prefrontal regions during response suppression may reflect the transfer of information from posterior temporal regions where semantic and lexical information
is stored to prefrontal regions where it is manipulated
in preparation for an appropriate response.

Statistics

Citations

27 citations in Web of Science®
31 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

97 downloads since deposited on 08 Jan 2009
18 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:September 2008
Deposited On:08 Jan 2009 09:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:48
Publisher:MIT Press
ISSN:0898-929X
Additional Information:Copyright: MIT Press
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn.2008.20107

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Filetype: PDF (Published version)
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations