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Delay or procrastination: A comparison of self-report and behavioral measures of procrastination and their impact on affective well-being


Krause, Kathrin; Freund, Alexandra M (2014). Delay or procrastination: A comparison of self-report and behavioral measures of procrastination and their impact on affective well-being. Personality and Individual Differences, 63:75-80.

Abstract

A short-term longitudinal study (N = 162 undergraduate students) replicates and extends previous findings on the relationship between self-reported procrastination and behavioral measures of procrastination (i.e., a comparison between actual and planned study time), and assesses their relation with affective well-being. All variables were measured 16 times over the course of 8 weeks. State measured self-reported and behavioral procrastination correlated only moderately. In line with the definition of procrastination as a combination of delaying to work on a task and discomfort with the delay, affective well-being was better predicted by self-reported than by behavioral procrastination. This suggests that self-reported procrastination better reflects the construct than a purely behavioral measure of procrastination. Consequences and implications for further assessment of procrastination are discussed.

Abstract

A short-term longitudinal study (N = 162 undergraduate students) replicates and extends previous findings on the relationship between self-reported procrastination and behavioral measures of procrastination (i.e., a comparison between actual and planned study time), and assesses their relation with affective well-being. All variables were measured 16 times over the course of 8 weeks. State measured self-reported and behavioral procrastination correlated only moderately. In line with the definition of procrastination as a combination of delaying to work on a task and discomfort with the delay, affective well-being was better predicted by self-reported than by behavioral procrastination. This suggests that self-reported procrastination better reflects the construct than a purely behavioral measure of procrastination. Consequences and implications for further assessment of procrastination are discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:23 Jul 2014 08:58
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 06:36
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0191-8869
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2014.01.050

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