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Segmental hair analysis for differentiation of tilidine intake from external contamination using LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS imaging


Poetzsch, Michael; Baumgartner, Markus R; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas (2015). Segmental hair analysis for differentiation of tilidine intake from external contamination using LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS imaging. Drug Testing and Analysis, 7(2):143-149.

Abstract

Segmental hair analysis has been used for monitoring changes of consumption habit of drugs. Contamination from the environment or sweat might cause interpretative problems. For this reason, hair analysis results were compared in hair samples taken 24 h and 30 days after a single tilidine dose. The 24-h hair samples already showed high concentrations of tilidine and nortilidine. Analysis of wash water from sample preparation confirmed external contamination by sweat as reason. The 30-day hair samples were still positive for tilidine in all segments. Negative wash-water analysis proved incorporation from sweat into the hair matrix. Interpretation of a forensic case was requested where two children had been administered tilidine by their nanny and tilidine/nortilidine had been detected in all hair segments, possibly indicating multiple applications. Taking into consideration the results of the present study and of MALDI-MS imaging, a single application as cause for analytical results could no longer be excluded. Interpretation of consumption behaviour of tilidine based on segmental hair analysis has to be done with caution, even after typical wash procedures during sample preparation. External sweat contamination followed by incorporation into the hair matrix can mimic chronic intake. For assessment of external contamination, hair samples should not only be collected several weeks but also one to a few days after intake. MALDI-MS imaging of single hair can be a complementary tool for interpretation. Limitations for interpretation of segmental hair analysis shown here might also be applicable to drugs with comparable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties.

Abstract

Segmental hair analysis has been used for monitoring changes of consumption habit of drugs. Contamination from the environment or sweat might cause interpretative problems. For this reason, hair analysis results were compared in hair samples taken 24 h and 30 days after a single tilidine dose. The 24-h hair samples already showed high concentrations of tilidine and nortilidine. Analysis of wash water from sample preparation confirmed external contamination by sweat as reason. The 30-day hair samples were still positive for tilidine in all segments. Negative wash-water analysis proved incorporation from sweat into the hair matrix. Interpretation of a forensic case was requested where two children had been administered tilidine by their nanny and tilidine/nortilidine had been detected in all hair segments, possibly indicating multiple applications. Taking into consideration the results of the present study and of MALDI-MS imaging, a single application as cause for analytical results could no longer be excluded. Interpretation of consumption behaviour of tilidine based on segmental hair analysis has to be done with caution, even after typical wash procedures during sample preparation. External sweat contamination followed by incorporation into the hair matrix can mimic chronic intake. For assessment of external contamination, hair samples should not only be collected several weeks but also one to a few days after intake. MALDI-MS imaging of single hair can be a complementary tool for interpretation. Limitations for interpretation of segmental hair analysis shown here might also be applicable to drugs with comparable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:25 Jul 2014 13:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:59
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1942-7603
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/dta.1674
PubMed ID:24935086

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