Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Altered responses to tone and phoneme mismatch in kindergartners at familial dyslexia risk


Maurer, Urs; Bucher, Kerstin; Brem, Silvia; Brandeis, Daniel (2003). Altered responses to tone and phoneme mismatch in kindergartners at familial dyslexia risk. NeuroReport, 14(17):2245-50.

Abstract

Differences in automatic auditory processing between kindergartners with (n = 31) and without (n = 29) familial dyslexia risk were investigated using frequency and phoneme mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigms with small deviance and short intervals. During an early mismatch response segment children at risk tended to have more mid-frontal positivity than controls, especially to phoneme deviance. Significant group differences were found in the late MMN segment, where the mismatch response of children at risk was attenuated to frequency deviance and less left lateralised to phoneme deviance. This indicates deviant automatic processing of phoneme and simple tone deviance in children at risk. These differences might be just related to the dyslexia risk or more specifically to future reading difficulties and thus be useful for early recognition of dyslexia.

Abstract

Differences in automatic auditory processing between kindergartners with (n = 31) and without (n = 29) familial dyslexia risk were investigated using frequency and phoneme mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigms with small deviance and short intervals. During an early mismatch response segment children at risk tended to have more mid-frontal positivity than controls, especially to phoneme deviance. Significant group differences were found in the late MMN segment, where the mismatch response of children at risk was attenuated to frequency deviance and less left lateralised to phoneme deviance. This indicates deviant automatic processing of phoneme and simple tone deviance in children at risk. These differences might be just related to the dyslexia risk or more specifically to future reading difficulties and thus be useful for early recognition of dyslexia.

Statistics

Citations

86 citations in Web of Science®
92 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2 December 2003
Deposited On:23 Jul 2014 12:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:59
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0959-4965
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/01.wnr.0000096518.69073.a7
PubMed ID:14625456

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations