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A keratin biomaterial gel hemostat derived from human hair: evaluation in a rabbit model of lethal liver injury


Aboushwareb, T; Eberli, D; Ward, C; Broda, C; Holcomb, J; Atala, A; Van Dyke, M (2009). A keratin biomaterial gel hemostat derived from human hair: evaluation in a rabbit model of lethal liver injury. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 90(1):45-54.

Abstract

Effective hemostatic dressings that are compatible with tissues are needed. Keratins are a class of biomaterials that can be derived by extraction of proteins from human hair. We have recently discovered that keratin biomaterials have hemostatic characteristics and hypothesize that a keratin hydrogel having the ability to absorb fluid and bind cells may be an effective hemostat. The goal of this study was to test a keratin hydrogel and evaluate it compared to current hemostats. Thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits received a lethal liver injury. Eight animals each were assigned to negative control, QuickClot(R), HemCon(R) bandage, and keratin treatment groups. Vital stats and other data were recorded during surgery and all surviving animals were sacrificed after 72 h. Histology was conducted on all surviving animals. Twenty-four-hour survival rates were 0%, 62.5%, 62.5%, and 75% for the negative control, QuickClot, HemCon, and keratin groups, respectively. Other outcomes included blood loss, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, shock index, and liver histology. All of the hemostats were statistically better than the negative control group at late operative time points. The keratin group consistently performed as well as, or better than, the commercial hemostats. Histology showed an interesting healing response at the hemostat-liver interface in the keratin group.

Abstract

Effective hemostatic dressings that are compatible with tissues are needed. Keratins are a class of biomaterials that can be derived by extraction of proteins from human hair. We have recently discovered that keratin biomaterials have hemostatic characteristics and hypothesize that a keratin hydrogel having the ability to absorb fluid and bind cells may be an effective hemostat. The goal of this study was to test a keratin hydrogel and evaluate it compared to current hemostats. Thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits received a lethal liver injury. Eight animals each were assigned to negative control, QuickClot(R), HemCon(R) bandage, and keratin treatment groups. Vital stats and other data were recorded during surgery and all surviving animals were sacrificed after 72 h. Histology was conducted on all surviving animals. Twenty-four-hour survival rates were 0%, 62.5%, 62.5%, and 75% for the negative control, QuickClot, HemCon, and keratin groups, respectively. Other outcomes included blood loss, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, shock index, and liver histology. All of the hemostats were statistically better than the negative control group at late operative time points. The keratin group consistently performed as well as, or better than, the commercial hemostats. Histology showed an interesting healing response at the hemostat-liver interface in the keratin group.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2009
Deposited On:11 Feb 2009 14:18
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 16:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1552-4973
Additional Information:The attached file is a preprint (accepted version) of an article published in Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 2008 The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.31251
PubMed ID:18988274

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