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The X-ray object recognition test (X-ray ORT) - a reliable and valid instrument for measuring visual abilities needed in X-ray screening


Hardmeier, Diana; Hofer, Franziska; Schwaninger, Adrian (2005). The X-ray object recognition test (X-ray ORT) - a reliable and valid instrument for measuring visual abilities needed in X-ray screening. In: Proceedings of the 39th Carnahan Conference on Security Technology, Las Palmas, Spain, 11 October 2005 - 14 October 2005, 189-192.

Abstract

Aviation security screening has become very important in recent years. It was shown by Schwaninger et al. (2004) that certain image-based factors influence detection when visually inspecting X-ray images of passenger bags. Threat items are more difficult to recognize when placed in close-packed bags (effect of bag complexity), when superimposed by other objects (effect of superposition), and when rotated (effect of viewpoint). The X-ray object recognition rest (X-ray ORT) was developed to measure the abilities needed to cope with these factors. In this study, we examined the reliability and validity of the X-ray ORT based on a sample of 453 aviation security screeners and 453 novices. Cronbach Alpha and split-half analysis revealed high reliability. Validity was examined using internal, convergent, discriminant and criterion-related validity estimates. The results show that the X-ray ORT is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring visual abilities needed in X-ray screening. This makes the X-ray ORT an interesting tool for competency and pre-employment assessment purposes.

Abstract

Aviation security screening has become very important in recent years. It was shown by Schwaninger et al. (2004) that certain image-based factors influence detection when visually inspecting X-ray images of passenger bags. Threat items are more difficult to recognize when placed in close-packed bags (effect of bag complexity), when superimposed by other objects (effect of superposition), and when rotated (effect of viewpoint). The X-ray object recognition rest (X-ray ORT) was developed to measure the abilities needed to cope with these factors. In this study, we examined the reliability and validity of the X-ray ORT based on a sample of 453 aviation security screeners and 453 novices. Cronbach Alpha and split-half analysis revealed high reliability. Validity was examined using internal, convergent, discriminant and criterion-related validity estimates. The results show that the X-ray ORT is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring visual abilities needed in X-ray screening. This makes the X-ray ORT an interesting tool for competency and pre-employment assessment purposes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Event End Date:14 October 2005
Deposited On:12 Aug 2014 15:15
Last Modified:13 Aug 2017 22:45
Publisher:O E S Publications
Series Name:International Carnahan Conference of Security Technology. Proceedings
ISSN:1071-6572
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/CCST.2005.1594876

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