Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evidence for color and luminance invariance of global form mechanisms


Rentzeperis, I; Kiper, D C (2010). Evidence for color and luminance invariance of global form mechanisms. Journal of Vision, 10(12):1-15.

Abstract

Human visual cortex contains mechanisms that pool local orientation information over large areas of visual space to support percepts of global form. Initial studies concluded that some of these mechanisms are cue invariant, in that they yield form percepts irrespective of whether the visual signals contain luminance or chromatic information. Later studies reported that these mechanisms are chromatically selective, albeit with a broad tuning in color space. We used Glass patterns and the phenomenon of adaptation to determine whether Glass pattern perception is mediated by mechanisms that are color and/or luminance selective, or not. Subjects were adapted to either a radial or concentric Glass pattern of a given color or luminance polarity. We measured the effect of adaptation on subsequent detection of Glass patterns with the same or different visual attributes. Our results show that adapting to a concentric or radial pattern significantly elevates threshold for the subsequent detection of patterns of the same form, irrespective of their color or luminance polarity, but that adaptation to luminance leads to higher threshold elevations than adaptation to color. We conclude that Glass pattern perception is mediated by perceptual mechanisms that are color invariant but not totally insensitive to the difference between color and luminance information.

Abstract

Human visual cortex contains mechanisms that pool local orientation information over large areas of visual space to support percepts of global form. Initial studies concluded that some of these mechanisms are cue invariant, in that they yield form percepts irrespective of whether the visual signals contain luminance or chromatic information. Later studies reported that these mechanisms are chromatically selective, albeit with a broad tuning in color space. We used Glass patterns and the phenomenon of adaptation to determine whether Glass pattern perception is mediated by mechanisms that are color and/or luminance selective, or not. Subjects were adapted to either a radial or concentric Glass pattern of a given color or luminance polarity. We measured the effect of adaptation on subsequent detection of Glass patterns with the same or different visual attributes. Our results show that adapting to a concentric or radial pattern significantly elevates threshold for the subsequent detection of patterns of the same form, irrespective of their color or luminance polarity, but that adaptation to luminance leads to higher threshold elevations than adaptation to color. We conclude that Glass pattern perception is mediated by perceptual mechanisms that are color invariant but not totally insensitive to the difference between color and luminance information.

Statistics

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

33 downloads since deposited on 03 Sep 2014
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:03 Sep 2014 12:44
Last Modified:27 Apr 2017 21:11
Publisher:Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
Series Name:Journal of Vision
Number of Pages:15
ISSN:1534-7362
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1167/10.12.6

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations