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Improved physiological properties of gravity-enforced reassembled rat and human pancreatic pseudo-islets


Zuellig, R A; Cavallari, G; Gerber, P; Tschopp, O; Spinas, G A; Moritz, W; Lehmann, R (2017). Improved physiological properties of gravity-enforced reassembled rat and human pancreatic pseudo-islets. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, 11(1):109-120.

Abstract

Previously we demonstrated the superiority of small islets vs large islets in terms of function and survival after transplantation, and we generated reaggregated rat islets (pseudo-islets) of standardized small dimensions by the hanging-drop culture method (HDCM). The aim of this study was to generate human pseudo-islets by HDCM and to evaluate and compare the physiological properties of rat and human pseudo-islets. Isolated rat and human islets were dissociated into single cells and incubated for 6-14 days by HDCM. Newly formed pseudo-islets were analysed for dimensions, morphology, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and total insulin content. The morphology of reaggregated human islets was similar to that of native islets, while rat pseudo-islets had a reduced content of α and δ cells. GSIS of small rat and human pseudo-islets (250 cells) was increased up to 4.0-fold (p < 0.01) and 2.5-fold (p < 0.001), respectively, when compared to their native counterparts. Human pseudo-islets showed a more pronounced first-phase insulin secretion as compared to intact islets. GSIS was inversely correlated to islet size, and small islets (250 cells) contained up to six-fold more insulin/cell than large islets (1500 cells). Tissue loss with this new technology could be reduced to 49.2 ± 1.5% in rat islets, as compared to the starting amount. With HDCM, pseudo-islets of standardized size with similar cellular composition and improved biological function can be generated, which compensates for tissue loss during production. Transplantation of small pseudo-islets may represent an attractive strategy to improve graft survival and function, due to better oxygen and nutrient supply during the phase of revascularization. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Abstract

Previously we demonstrated the superiority of small islets vs large islets in terms of function and survival after transplantation, and we generated reaggregated rat islets (pseudo-islets) of standardized small dimensions by the hanging-drop culture method (HDCM). The aim of this study was to generate human pseudo-islets by HDCM and to evaluate and compare the physiological properties of rat and human pseudo-islets. Isolated rat and human islets were dissociated into single cells and incubated for 6-14 days by HDCM. Newly formed pseudo-islets were analysed for dimensions, morphology, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and total insulin content. The morphology of reaggregated human islets was similar to that of native islets, while rat pseudo-islets had a reduced content of α and δ cells. GSIS of small rat and human pseudo-islets (250 cells) was increased up to 4.0-fold (p < 0.01) and 2.5-fold (p < 0.001), respectively, when compared to their native counterparts. Human pseudo-islets showed a more pronounced first-phase insulin secretion as compared to intact islets. GSIS was inversely correlated to islet size, and small islets (250 cells) contained up to six-fold more insulin/cell than large islets (1500 cells). Tissue loss with this new technology could be reduced to 49.2 ± 1.5% in rat islets, as compared to the starting amount. With HDCM, pseudo-islets of standardized size with similar cellular composition and improved biological function can be generated, which compensates for tissue loss during production. Transplantation of small pseudo-islets may represent an attractive strategy to improve graft survival and function, due to better oxygen and nutrient supply during the phase of revascularization. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:04 Feb 2016 13:55
Last Modified:17 Jan 2017 02:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1932-6254
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/term.1891
PubMed ID:24737702

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