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Transport of amino acids in the kidney


Makrides, Victoria; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, François (2014). Transport of amino acids in the kidney. In: Pollock, David M. Comprehensive Physiology. s.n.: American Physiological Society, 367-403.

Abstract

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and key intermediates in the synthesis of biologically important molecules, as well as energy sources, neurotransmitters, regulators of cellular metabolism, etc. The efficient recovery of amino acids from the primary filtrate is a well-conserved key role of the kidney proximal tubule. Additionally, renal metabolism participates in the whole body disposition of amino acids. Therefore, a wide array of axially heterogeneously expressed transporters is localized on both epithelial membranes. For transepithelial transport, luminal uptake, which is carried out mainly by active symporters, is coupled with a mostly passive basolateral efflux. Many transporters require partner proteins for appropriate localization, or to modulate transporter activity, and/or increase substrate supply. Interacting proteins include cell surface antigens (CD98), endoplasmic reticulum proteins (GTRAP3-18 or 41), or enzymes (ACE2 and aminopeptidase N). In the past two decades, the molecular identification of transporters has led to significant advances in our understanding of amino acid transport and aminoacidurias arising from defects in renal transport. Furthermore, the three-dimensional crystal structures of bacterial homologues have been used to yield new insights on the structure and function of mammalian transporters. Additionally, transgenic animal models have contributed to our understanding of the role of amino acid transporters in the kidney and other organs and/or at critical developmental stages. Progress in elucidation of the renal contribution to systemic amino acid homeostasis requires further integration of kinetic, regulatory, and expression data of amino acid transporters into our understanding of physiological regulatory networks controlling metabolism.

Abstract

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and key intermediates in the synthesis of biologically important molecules, as well as energy sources, neurotransmitters, regulators of cellular metabolism, etc. The efficient recovery of amino acids from the primary filtrate is a well-conserved key role of the kidney proximal tubule. Additionally, renal metabolism participates in the whole body disposition of amino acids. Therefore, a wide array of axially heterogeneously expressed transporters is localized on both epithelial membranes. For transepithelial transport, luminal uptake, which is carried out mainly by active symporters, is coupled with a mostly passive basolateral efflux. Many transporters require partner proteins for appropriate localization, or to modulate transporter activity, and/or increase substrate supply. Interacting proteins include cell surface antigens (CD98), endoplasmic reticulum proteins (GTRAP3-18 or 41), or enzymes (ACE2 and aminopeptidase N). In the past two decades, the molecular identification of transporters has led to significant advances in our understanding of amino acid transport and aminoacidurias arising from defects in renal transport. Furthermore, the three-dimensional crystal structures of bacterial homologues have been used to yield new insights on the structure and function of mammalian transporters. Additionally, transgenic animal models have contributed to our understanding of the role of amino acid transporters in the kidney and other organs and/or at critical developmental stages. Progress in elucidation of the renal contribution to systemic amino acid homeostasis requires further integration of kinetic, regulatory, and expression data of amino acid transporters into our understanding of physiological regulatory networks controlling metabolism.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2014
Deposited On:02 Oct 2014 07:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:23
Publisher:American Physiological Society
Series Name:Handbook of Physiology
Number:4
ISSN:0072-9876
ISBN:9780470650714
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/cphy.c130028
PubMed ID:24692143

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