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The gut-brain axis in obesity


Buhmann, Helena; le Roux, Carel W; Bueter, Marco (2014). The gut-brain axis in obesity. Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology, 28(4):559-571.

Abstract

Currently the only effective treatment for morbid obesity with a proven mortality benefit is surgical intervention. The underlying mechanisms of these surgical techniques are unclear, but alterations in circulating gut hormone levels have been demonstrated to be at least one contributing factor. Gut hormones seem to communicate information from the gastrointestinal tract to the regulatory appetite centres within the central nervous system (CNS) via the so-called 'Gut-Brain-Axis'. Such information may be transferred to the CNS either via vagal or non-vagal afferent nerve signalling or directly via blood circulation. Complex neural networks, distributed throughout the forebrain and brainstem, are in control of feeding and energy homoeostasis. This article aims to review how appetite is potentially regulated by these gastrointestinal hormones. Identification of the underlying mechanisms of appetite and weight control may pave the way to develop better surgical techniques and new therapies in the future.

Abstract

Currently the only effective treatment for morbid obesity with a proven mortality benefit is surgical intervention. The underlying mechanisms of these surgical techniques are unclear, but alterations in circulating gut hormone levels have been demonstrated to be at least one contributing factor. Gut hormones seem to communicate information from the gastrointestinal tract to the regulatory appetite centres within the central nervous system (CNS) via the so-called 'Gut-Brain-Axis'. Such information may be transferred to the CNS either via vagal or non-vagal afferent nerve signalling or directly via blood circulation. Complex neural networks, distributed throughout the forebrain and brainstem, are in control of feeding and energy homoeostasis. This article aims to review how appetite is potentially regulated by these gastrointestinal hormones. Identification of the underlying mechanisms of appetite and weight control may pave the way to develop better surgical techniques and new therapies in the future.

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21 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:23 Oct 2014 08:52
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 07:35
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1521-6918
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bpg.2014.07.003
PubMed ID:25194175

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