Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in cells - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Alicia; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Ramos, Elena; Villa-Piña, Tamara; Lamas, Santiago; Bogdanova, Anna; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio (2014). Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in cells. Free Radical Biology & Medicine, 71:146-156.

Abstract

Oxygen is a key molecule for cell metabolism. Eukaryotic cells sense the reduction in oxygen availability (hypoxia) and trigger a series of cellular and systemic responses to adapt to hypoxia, including the optimization of oxygen consumption. Many of these responses are mediated by a genetic program induced by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), regulated by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD or EGLN) that use oxygen as a substrate producing HIF hydroxylation. In parallel to these oxygen sensors modulating gene expression within hours, acute modulation of protein function in response to hypoxia is known to occur within minutes. Free radicals acting as second messengers, and oxidative posttranslational modifications, have been implied in both groups of responses. Localization and speciation of the paradoxical increase in reactive oxygen species production in hypoxia remain debatable. We have observed that several cell types respond to acute hypoxia with a transient increase in superoxide production for about 10 min, probably originating in the mitochondria. This may explain in part the apparently divergent results found by various groups that have not taken into account the time frame of hypoxic ROS production. We propose that this acute and transient hypoxia-induced superoxide burst may be translated into oxidative signals contributing to hypoxic adaptation and preconditioning.

Abstract

Oxygen is a key molecule for cell metabolism. Eukaryotic cells sense the reduction in oxygen availability (hypoxia) and trigger a series of cellular and systemic responses to adapt to hypoxia, including the optimization of oxygen consumption. Many of these responses are mediated by a genetic program induced by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), regulated by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD or EGLN) that use oxygen as a substrate producing HIF hydroxylation. In parallel to these oxygen sensors modulating gene expression within hours, acute modulation of protein function in response to hypoxia is known to occur within minutes. Free radicals acting as second messengers, and oxidative posttranslational modifications, have been implied in both groups of responses. Localization and speciation of the paradoxical increase in reactive oxygen species production in hypoxia remain debatable. We have observed that several cell types respond to acute hypoxia with a transient increase in superoxide production for about 10 min, probably originating in the mitochondria. This may explain in part the apparently divergent results found by various groups that have not taken into account the time frame of hypoxic ROS production. We propose that this acute and transient hypoxia-induced superoxide burst may be translated into oxidative signals contributing to hypoxic adaptation and preconditioning.

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 23 Oct 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:2014
Deposited On:23 Oct 2014 09:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:25
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0891-5849
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2014.03.011
PubMed ID:24637263

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 2MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations