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Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals chaperone-mediated expansion of substrate protein


Kellner, Ruth; Hofmann, Hagen; Barducci, Alessandro; Wunderlich, Bengt; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin (2014). Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals chaperone-mediated expansion of substrate protein. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(37):13355-13360.

Abstract

Molecular chaperones are an essential part of the machinery that avoids protein aggregation and misfolding in vivo. However, understanding the molecular basis of how chaperones prevent such undesirable interactions requires the conformational changes within substrate proteins to be probed during chaperone action. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate how the DnaJ-DnaK chaperone system alters the conformational distribution of the denatured substrate protein rhodanese. We find that in a first step the ATP-independent binding of DnaJ to denatured rhodanese results in a compact denatured ensemble of the substrate protein. The following ATP-dependent binding of multiple DnaK molecules, however, leads to a surprisingly large expansion of denatured rhodanese. Molecular simulations indicate that hard-core repulsion between the multiple DnaK molecules provides the underlying mechanism for disrupting even strong interactions within the substrate protein and preparing it for processing by downstream chaperone systems.

Abstract

Molecular chaperones are an essential part of the machinery that avoids protein aggregation and misfolding in vivo. However, understanding the molecular basis of how chaperones prevent such undesirable interactions requires the conformational changes within substrate proteins to be probed during chaperone action. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate how the DnaJ-DnaK chaperone system alters the conformational distribution of the denatured substrate protein rhodanese. We find that in a first step the ATP-independent binding of DnaJ to denatured rhodanese results in a compact denatured ensemble of the substrate protein. The following ATP-dependent binding of multiple DnaK molecules, however, leads to a surprisingly large expansion of denatured rhodanese. Molecular simulations indicate that hard-core repulsion between the multiple DnaK molecules provides the underlying mechanism for disrupting even strong interactions within the substrate protein and preparing it for processing by downstream chaperone systems.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:29 Oct 2014 16:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:26
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1407086111
PubMed ID:25165400

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