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Inducible chemical defences in animals


Heyttyey, Attila; Tóth, Zoltán; Van Buskirk, Josh (2014). Inducible chemical defences in animals. Oikos, 123:1025-1028.

Abstract

Phenotypic plasticity is extremely widespread in the behaviour, morphology and life-history of animals. However, inducible changes in the production of defensive chemicals are described mostly in plants and surprisingly little is known about similar plasticity in chemical defences of animals. Inducible chemical defences may be common in animals because many are known to produce toxins, the synthesis of toxins is likely to be costly, and there are a few known cases of animals adjusting their toxin production to changes in environmental conditions. We outline what is known about the occurrence of inducible chemical defences in animals and argue that there is immense potential for progress in this field. Possible directions include surveying diverse taxa to explore how general its occurrence may be and testing for selection acting on inducible chemical defences. Data on inducible chemical defences would provide insight into life-history tradeoffs by enabling novel tests of how time-costs and resource-costs affect life-history. If the synthesis of toxic compounds by animals proves accessible to manipulation, as it is in plants and fungi, this will open the way to refined estimates of the fitness costs of defence, ultimately providing a clearer picture of how plasticity evolves and is maintained in nature.

Abstract

Phenotypic plasticity is extremely widespread in the behaviour, morphology and life-history of animals. However, inducible changes in the production of defensive chemicals are described mostly in plants and surprisingly little is known about similar plasticity in chemical defences of animals. Inducible chemical defences may be common in animals because many are known to produce toxins, the synthesis of toxins is likely to be costly, and there are a few known cases of animals adjusting their toxin production to changes in environmental conditions. We outline what is known about the occurrence of inducible chemical defences in animals and argue that there is immense potential for progress in this field. Possible directions include surveying diverse taxa to explore how general its occurrence may be and testing for selection acting on inducible chemical defences. Data on inducible chemical defences would provide insight into life-history tradeoffs by enabling novel tests of how time-costs and resource-costs affect life-history. If the synthesis of toxic compounds by animals proves accessible to manipulation, as it is in plants and fungi, this will open the way to refined estimates of the fitness costs of defence, ultimately providing a clearer picture of how plasticity evolves and is maintained in nature.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:30 Oct 2014 09:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:26
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0030-1299
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/oik.01338

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