Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Trauma-induced cutaneous focal mucinosis of the mammary areola: an unusual presentation


Kempf, Werner; von Stumberg, Britta; Denisjuk, Natalja; Bode, Beata; Rongioletti, Franco (2014). Trauma-induced cutaneous focal mucinosis of the mammary areola: an unusual presentation. Dermatopathology, 1(1):24-28.

Abstract

Cutaneous focal mucinosis (CFM) is a localized form of cutaneous dermal mucinosis clinically presenting as an asymptomatic skin-colored papule or nodule. The etiopathogenesis of CFM is unclear, but it is thought to represent a reactive lesion. Although trauma has been suspected as a triggering factor, it has never been proven in cases of CFM. We report 2 male patients with trauma-induced CFM arising at the mammary areola, which is an unusual site for CFM. Both male patients presented with a solitary nodular lesion of up to 2 cm in diameter at the right areola. Histology was characterized by circumscribed abundant dermal mucin deposits in a polylobulated pattern without an increased number of fibroblasts or capillaries and with absence of an inflammatory infiltrate. Alcian blue stain at pH 2.5 highlighted the mucin deposits. Immunohistochemistry showed partial expression of FXIIIa by 30% of the stromal cells, but no reactivity for CD34, smooth muscle actin, desmin, CD68 and S-100. A history of trauma (laser-based epilation, piercing) preceded the development of CFM in both patients. Surgical excision resulted in complete remission without recurrence. Follow-up in both our patients did not reveal recurrences. CFM has to be distinguished from benign and malignant myxoid neoplasms.

Abstract

Cutaneous focal mucinosis (CFM) is a localized form of cutaneous dermal mucinosis clinically presenting as an asymptomatic skin-colored papule or nodule. The etiopathogenesis of CFM is unclear, but it is thought to represent a reactive lesion. Although trauma has been suspected as a triggering factor, it has never been proven in cases of CFM. We report 2 male patients with trauma-induced CFM arising at the mammary areola, which is an unusual site for CFM. Both male patients presented with a solitary nodular lesion of up to 2 cm in diameter at the right areola. Histology was characterized by circumscribed abundant dermal mucin deposits in a polylobulated pattern without an increased number of fibroblasts or capillaries and with absence of an inflammatory infiltrate. Alcian blue stain at pH 2.5 highlighted the mucin deposits. Immunohistochemistry showed partial expression of FXIIIa by 30% of the stromal cells, but no reactivity for CD34, smooth muscle actin, desmin, CD68 and S-100. A history of trauma (laser-based epilation, piercing) preceded the development of CFM in both patients. Surgical excision resulted in complete remission without recurrence. Follow-up in both our patients did not reveal recurrences. CFM has to be distinguished from benign and malignant myxoid neoplasms.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

50 downloads since deposited on 30 Oct 2014
10 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Pathology and Molecular Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Breast; Cutaneous focal mucinosis; Mucinoses; Trauma
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:30 Oct 2014 13:35
Last Modified:28 Aug 2017 16:40
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:2296-3529
Additional Information:The final, published version of this article is available at http://www.karger.com/?doi=10.1159/000358249
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000358249
PubMed ID:27047919

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 538kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0)