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Promoting good decisions: How regulatory focus affects group information processing and decision-making


Burtscher, Michael J; Meyer, Bertolt (2014). Promoting good decisions: How regulatory focus affects group information processing and decision-making. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 17(5):663-681.

Abstract

Decision-making groups often fail to exploit their full potential because they do not integrate all relevant information. We propose to address this issue by interpreting group information processing as a motivational process that is influenced by group goal structure. In line with this approach, we apply regulatory focus theory to decision-making groups. Specifically, we investigate the effects of a promotion versus a prevention focus framing on group decision quality and information processing. Sixty-three-person groups solved five decision-making tasks based on the “stranded in the desert” scenario. Regulatory focus was manipulated via pay-off schemes and group interactions were videotaped. We found that groups in a promotion focus solved more tasks correctly than groups in a prevention focus. This effect on decision quality was mediated by group information processing. Finally, we show that regulatory focus influences group interaction patterns, which represents an important extension of regulatory focus research in groups.

Abstract

Decision-making groups often fail to exploit their full potential because they do not integrate all relevant information. We propose to address this issue by interpreting group information processing as a motivational process that is influenced by group goal structure. In line with this approach, we apply regulatory focus theory to decision-making groups. Specifically, we investigate the effects of a promotion versus a prevention focus framing on group decision quality and information processing. Sixty-three-person groups solved five decision-making tasks based on the “stranded in the desert” scenario. Regulatory focus was manipulated via pay-off schemes and group interactions were videotaped. We found that groups in a promotion focus solved more tasks correctly than groups in a prevention focus. This effect on decision quality was mediated by group information processing. Finally, we show that regulatory focus influences group interaction patterns, which represents an important extension of regulatory focus research in groups.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:27 Oct 2014 10:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:27
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:1368-4302
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430214522138

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