Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Characteristics and treatment outcomes of 69 cases with early prosthetic joint infections of the hip and knee


Achermann, Y; Stasch, P; Preiss, S; Lucke, K; Vogt, M (2014). Characteristics and treatment outcomes of 69 cases with early prosthetic joint infections of the hip and knee. Infection, 42(3):511-519.

Abstract

Purpose: Early prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be treated with an intensive surgical debridement and implant retention (DAIR) of the prosthesis if (1) the prosthesis is stable, (2) the pathogen is not a difficult-to-treat microorganism, (3) symptoms have lasted for <3 weeks and (4) a sinus tract is absent.
Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the treatment outcome of early PJI in the hip and knee in a single orthopaedic centre. An early PJI was defined as a prosthesis infection within 3 months after primary implantation or revision surgery for a non-infectious cause.
Results: We identified 69 patients with confirmed early PJI, with a median age of 71 (range 33-84) years. Only 64 % presented with ≥2 acute signs of infection. The most commonly isolated bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci (38 %) and Staphylococcus aureus (25 %). Surgical procedures included DAIR (50 cases, 69 %) and two-stage exchange (19 cases, 31 %). At last follow-up, five of remaining living 67 patients (7.5 %) had a relapse of infection. The overall relapse-free survival of the prosthesis after 2 years was 92.3 % (95 % confidence interval 82-97 %) with no significant difference between DAIR and exchange of prosthesis.
Conclusion: Our data suggest that an early PJI should be treated with DAIR as a less invasive procedure whenever possible according to the established treatment algorithm.

Abstract

Purpose: Early prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be treated with an intensive surgical debridement and implant retention (DAIR) of the prosthesis if (1) the prosthesis is stable, (2) the pathogen is not a difficult-to-treat microorganism, (3) symptoms have lasted for <3 weeks and (4) a sinus tract is absent.
Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the treatment outcome of early PJI in the hip and knee in a single orthopaedic centre. An early PJI was defined as a prosthesis infection within 3 months after primary implantation or revision surgery for a non-infectious cause.
Results: We identified 69 patients with confirmed early PJI, with a median age of 71 (range 33-84) years. Only 64 % presented with ≥2 acute signs of infection. The most commonly isolated bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci (38 %) and Staphylococcus aureus (25 %). Surgical procedures included DAIR (50 cases, 69 %) and two-stage exchange (19 cases, 31 %). At last follow-up, five of remaining living 67 patients (7.5 %) had a relapse of infection. The overall relapse-free survival of the prosthesis after 2 years was 92.3 % (95 % confidence interval 82-97 %) with no significant difference between DAIR and exchange of prosthesis.
Conclusion: Our data suggest that an early PJI should be treated with DAIR as a less invasive procedure whenever possible according to the established treatment algorithm.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
6 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
5 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

82 downloads since deposited on 23 Jan 2015
37 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2014
Deposited On:23 Jan 2015 13:38
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 22:59
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0300-8126
Additional Information:The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s15010-014-0584-6
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s15010-014-0584-6
PubMed ID:24474624

Download

Download PDF  'Characteristics and treatment outcomes of 69 cases with early prosthetic joint infections of the hip and knee'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 196kB
View at publisher