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XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death


Oishi, Naoki; Duscha, Stefan; Boukari, Heithem; Meyer, Martin; Xie, Jing; Wei, Gao; Schrepfer, Thomas; Roschitzki, Bernd; Böttger, Erik C; Schacht, Jochen (2015). XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death. Cell Death and Disease, 6(e1763):online.

Abstract

Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1(+/-)) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1(+/-) mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level.

Abstract

Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1(+/-)) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1(+/-) mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:29 May 2015 06:52
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 09:10
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2041-4889
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/cddis.2015.108
PubMed ID:25973683

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