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An inhibitor of serine proteases, neuroserpin, acts as a neuroprotective agent in a mouse model of neurodegenerative disease


Simonin, Y; Charron, Y; Sonderegger, P; Vassalli, J D; Kato, A C (2006). An inhibitor of serine proteases, neuroserpin, acts as a neuroprotective agent in a mouse model of neurodegenerative disease. Journal of Neuroscience, 26(41):10614-10619.

Abstract

Various studies suggest that proteolytic activity may be involved in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including stroke and seizure. In this report, we examined the role of tryptic serine proteases, plasminogen activators (PAs), in the evolution of a neurodegenerative disease. Transgenic mice overexpressing an axonally secreted inhibitor of serine proteases (neuroserpin) were crossed with mice characterized by a "dying-back" motor neuron disease [progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn/pmn)]. Compared with pmn/pmn mice that showed an increase in PA activity, double mutant mice had decreased PA activity in sciatic nerves and spinal cord; their lifespan was increased by 50%, their motor behavior was stabilized, and histological analysis revealed increased numbers of myelinated axons and rescue of motoneuron number and size. This is the first report showing that a class of serine proteases (PAs) may be involved in the pathogenesis of a motor neuron disease and more specifically in axonal degeneration. Inhibiting serine proteases could offer a new strategy for delaying these disorders.

Abstract

Various studies suggest that proteolytic activity may be involved in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including stroke and seizure. In this report, we examined the role of tryptic serine proteases, plasminogen activators (PAs), in the evolution of a neurodegenerative disease. Transgenic mice overexpressing an axonally secreted inhibitor of serine proteases (neuroserpin) were crossed with mice characterized by a "dying-back" motor neuron disease [progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn/pmn)]. Compared with pmn/pmn mice that showed an increase in PA activity, double mutant mice had decreased PA activity in sciatic nerves and spinal cord; their lifespan was increased by 50%, their motor behavior was stabilized, and histological analysis revealed increased numbers of myelinated axons and rescue of motoneuron number and size. This is the first report showing that a class of serine proteases (PAs) may be involved in the pathogenesis of a motor neuron disease and more specifically in axonal degeneration. Inhibiting serine proteases could offer a new strategy for delaying these disorders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:11 October 2006
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:20
Last Modified:25 Feb 2020 09:54
Publisher:Society for Neuroscience
ISSN:0270-6474
Funders:Ass. Franç. contre les Myopathies, Inst. Intern. Recherche Paraplégie, Swiss National Science Foundation, Eur. Network Excellence "NeuroNE"
Additional Information:Holder of copyright: The Society for Neuroscience
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3582-06.2006
PubMed ID:17035547
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project TitleAss. Franç. contre les Myopathies, Inst. Intern. Recherche Paraplégie, Swiss National Science Foundation, Eur. Network Excellence "NeuroNE"

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