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Isolated reduction of haematocrit does not compromise in vitro blood coagulation


Iselin, B M; Willimann, P F; Seifert, Burkhardt; Casutt, M; Bombeli, T; Zalunardo, M P; Pasch, T; Spahn, D R (2001). Isolated reduction of haematocrit does not compromise in vitro blood coagulation. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 87(2):246-249.

Abstract

Low haematocrit values are generally well tolerated in terms of oxygen transport but a low haematocrit might interfere with blood coagulation. We thus sampled 60 ml of blood in 30 healthy volunteers. The blood was centrifuged for 30 min at 2000 g and separated into plasma, which contained the platelet fraction, and packed red blood cells. The blood was subsequently reconstituted by combining the entire plasma fraction with a mixture of packed red blood cells, 0.9% saline, so that the final haematocrit was either 40, 30, 20, or 10%. Blood coagulation was assessed by computerized Thrombelastograph analysis. Data were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance and post-hoc paired t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Decreasing the haematocrit from 40 to 10% resulted in a shortening of reaction time (r) and coagulation time (k), and an increase in angle alpha, maximum amplitude (MA) and clot strength (G) (all P<0.02). This pattern represents acceleration of blood coagulation with low haematocrit values. The isolated reduction in haematocrit, therefore, does not compromise in vitro blood coagulation.

Abstract

Low haematocrit values are generally well tolerated in terms of oxygen transport but a low haematocrit might interfere with blood coagulation. We thus sampled 60 ml of blood in 30 healthy volunteers. The blood was centrifuged for 30 min at 2000 g and separated into plasma, which contained the platelet fraction, and packed red blood cells. The blood was subsequently reconstituted by combining the entire plasma fraction with a mixture of packed red blood cells, 0.9% saline, so that the final haematocrit was either 40, 30, 20, or 10%. Blood coagulation was assessed by computerized Thrombelastograph analysis. Data were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance and post-hoc paired t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Decreasing the haematocrit from 40 to 10% resulted in a shortening of reaction time (r) and coagulation time (k), and an increase in angle alpha, maximum amplitude (MA) and clot strength (G) (all P<0.02). This pattern represents acceleration of blood coagulation with low haematocrit values. The isolated reduction in haematocrit, therefore, does not compromise in vitro blood coagulation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2001
Deposited On:07 Jul 2015 08:13
Last Modified:27 Aug 2018 14:24
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0007-0912
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/87.2.246
PubMed ID:11493497

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