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Compromised blood coagulation: an in vitro comparison of hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 using thrombelastography


Jamnicki, M; Zollinger, A; Seifert, Burkhardt; Popovic, D; Pasch, T; Spahn, D R (1998). Compromised blood coagulation: an in vitro comparison of hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 using thrombelastography. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 87(5):989-993.

Abstract

UNLABELLED We compared the effects of progressive in vitro hemodilution (30% and 60%) on blood coagulation in 80 patients receiving one of two different 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions using thrombelastography (TEG). The newly developed solution has a mean molecular weight of 130 kD and a degree of substitution, defined as the average number of hydroxyethyl groups per glucose moiety, of 0.4 (HES 130/0.4); the conventional solution has a mean molecular weight of 200 kD and a degree of substitution of 0.5 (HES 200/0.5). Both HES solutions significantly compromised blood coagulation, as seen by an increase in reaction time and coagulation time and a decrease in angle alpha, maximal amplitude, and coagulation index (all P < 0.05). There was no difference between HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5 diluted blood (P > 0.05 for all TEG variables). When analyzing the intrinsic HES effect by taking hemodilution with 0.9% saline into account, progressive hemodilution with both HES solutions resulted in an increasing clot lysis (P < 0.05 after 60 min). Again, there was no difference between HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5 diluted blood. We conclude that HES 130/ 0.4 and HES 200/0.5 compromise blood coagulation to the same degree.
IMPLICATIONS Progressive in vitro hemodilution using hydroxyethyl starch (HES) compromises blood coagulation. We observed similar effects of a new HES solution with a mean molecular weight of 130 kD and a degree of substitution of 0.4 (HES 130/0.4), compared with the conventional HES 200/0.5.

Abstract

UNLABELLED We compared the effects of progressive in vitro hemodilution (30% and 60%) on blood coagulation in 80 patients receiving one of two different 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions using thrombelastography (TEG). The newly developed solution has a mean molecular weight of 130 kD and a degree of substitution, defined as the average number of hydroxyethyl groups per glucose moiety, of 0.4 (HES 130/0.4); the conventional solution has a mean molecular weight of 200 kD and a degree of substitution of 0.5 (HES 200/0.5). Both HES solutions significantly compromised blood coagulation, as seen by an increase in reaction time and coagulation time and a decrease in angle alpha, maximal amplitude, and coagulation index (all P < 0.05). There was no difference between HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5 diluted blood (P > 0.05 for all TEG variables). When analyzing the intrinsic HES effect by taking hemodilution with 0.9% saline into account, progressive hemodilution with both HES solutions resulted in an increasing clot lysis (P < 0.05 after 60 min). Again, there was no difference between HES 130/0.4 and HES 200/0.5 diluted blood. We conclude that HES 130/ 0.4 and HES 200/0.5 compromise blood coagulation to the same degree.
IMPLICATIONS Progressive in vitro hemodilution using hydroxyethyl starch (HES) compromises blood coagulation. We observed similar effects of a new HES solution with a mean molecular weight of 130 kD and a degree of substitution of 0.4 (HES 130/0.4), compared with the conventional HES 200/0.5.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Language:English
Date:November 1998
Deposited On:15 Oct 2015 10:57
Last Modified:18 Aug 2018 22:44
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0003-2999
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/00000539-199811000-00002
PubMed ID:9806670

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