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Frequent job changes can signal poor work attitude and reduce employability


Cohn, Alain; Maréchal, Michel; Schneider, Frédéric; Weber, Roberto A (2019). Frequent job changes can signal poor work attitude and reduce employability. Working paper series / Department of Economics 210, University of Zurich.

Abstract

We study whether employment history provides information about a worker’s “work attitude,” i.e., the tendency to act cooperatively and reliably in the workplace. We conjecture that, holding all else equal, frequent job changes can indicate poor work attitude and that this information is transmitted through employment histories. We find support for this hypothesis across three studies that employ complementary lab, field, and survey experiments, as well as in labor market panel data. First, a tightly controlled laboratory labor market experiment demonstrates that prior employment information allows employers to screen for reliable and cooperative workers and that these workers obtain better employment outcomes. Second, we conduct a field experiment that varies the frequency of job changes in applicants’ resumes and find that those with fewer job changes receive substantially more callbacks from prospective employers. Third, a survey experiment with Human Resources professionals confirms that the resume manipulations in the field study create different perceptions of work attitude and that these largely account for the callback differences. Finally, we find evidence consistent with our hypothesized relationships in empirical labor market data. Our work highlights the potential importance of job history as a signal of work attitude in labor markets, and points to a potential cost of frequent job changes.

Abstract

We study whether employment history provides information about a worker’s “work attitude,” i.e., the tendency to act cooperatively and reliably in the workplace. We conjecture that, holding all else equal, frequent job changes can indicate poor work attitude and that this information is transmitted through employment histories. We find support for this hypothesis across three studies that employ complementary lab, field, and survey experiments, as well as in labor market panel data. First, a tightly controlled laboratory labor market experiment demonstrates that prior employment information allows employers to screen for reliable and cooperative workers and that these workers obtain better employment outcomes. Second, we conduct a field experiment that varies the frequency of job changes in applicants’ resumes and find that those with fewer job changes receive substantially more callbacks from prospective employers. Third, a survey experiment with Human Resources professionals confirms that the resume manipulations in the field study create different perceptions of work attitude and that these largely account for the callback differences. Finally, we find evidence consistent with our hypothesized relationships in empirical labor market data. Our work highlights the potential importance of job history as a signal of work attitude in labor markets, and points to a potential cost of frequent job changes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Working Paper Series > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
JEL Classification:C90, C93, J01, E24
Uncontrolled Keywords:Employability, work attitude, job mobility, Beschäftigungsfähigkeit, Arbeitsplatzwechsel, berufliche Mobilität, Experiment, Umfrage
Language:English
Date:November 2019
Deposited On:01 Dec 2015 15:53
Last Modified:12 Feb 2020 13:20
Series Name:Working paper series / Department of Economics
Number of Pages:44
ISSN:1664-7041
Additional Information:Revised version ; Former title: Job history, work attitude, and employability. Auch publiziert als CESifo Working Paper No. 7976
OA Status:Green
Official URL:https://www.econ.uzh.ch/static/release/workingpapers.php?id=889
Related URLs:https://www.cesifo.org/en/publikationen/2019/working-paper/frequent-job-changes-can-signal-poor-work-attitude-and-reduce

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