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Evolution of selfing: recurrent patterns in molecular adaptation


Shimizu, Kentaro K; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi (2015). Evolution of selfing: recurrent patterns in molecular adaptation. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 46:593-622.

Abstract

Selfing has evolved in animals, fungi, and plants, and since Darwin’s pioneering study, it is considered one of the most frequent evolutionary trends in flowering plants. Generally, the evolution of selfing is characterized by a loss of self-incompatibility, the selfing syndrome, and changes in genome-wide polymorphism patterns. Recent interdisciplinary studies involving molecular functional experiments, genome-wide data, experimental evolution, and evolutionary ecology using Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, and other species show that the evolution of selfing is not merely a degradation of outcrossing traits but a model for studying the recurrent patterns underlying adaptive molecular evolution. For example, in wild Arabidopsis relatives, self-compatibility evolved from mutations in the male specificity gene, S-LOCUS CYSTEINE-RICH PROTEIN/S-LOCUS PROTEIN 11 (SCR/SP11), rather than the female specificity gene, S-LOCUS RECEPTOR KINASE (SRK), supporting the theoretical prediction of sexual asymmetry. Prevalence of dominant self-compatible mutations is consistent with Haldane’s sieve, which acts against recessive adaptive mutations. Time estimates based on genome-wide polymorphisms and self-incompatibility genes generally support the recent origin of selfing.

Abstract

Selfing has evolved in animals, fungi, and plants, and since Darwin’s pioneering study, it is considered one of the most frequent evolutionary trends in flowering plants. Generally, the evolution of selfing is characterized by a loss of self-incompatibility, the selfing syndrome, and changes in genome-wide polymorphism patterns. Recent interdisciplinary studies involving molecular functional experiments, genome-wide data, experimental evolution, and evolutionary ecology using Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, and other species show that the evolution of selfing is not merely a degradation of outcrossing traits but a model for studying the recurrent patterns underlying adaptive molecular evolution. For example, in wild Arabidopsis relatives, self-compatibility evolved from mutations in the male specificity gene, S-LOCUS CYSTEINE-RICH PROTEIN/S-LOCUS PROTEIN 11 (SCR/SP11), rather than the female specificity gene, S-LOCUS RECEPTOR KINASE (SRK), supporting the theoretical prediction of sexual asymmetry. Prevalence of dominant self-compatible mutations is consistent with Haldane’s sieve, which acts against recessive adaptive mutations. Time estimates based on genome-wide polymorphisms and self-incompatibility genes generally support the recent origin of selfing.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
08 Research Priority Programs > Evolution in Action: From Genomes to Ecosystems
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Physical Sciences > Ecology
Language:English
Date:December 2015
Deposited On:11 Dec 2015 10:07
Last Modified:26 Jan 2022 07:26
Publisher:Annual Reviews
ISSN:1545-2069
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054249
Official URL:http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054249
Related URLs:http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/eprint/SjP8kaSPpXgCyQ6u4FEF/full/10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054249 (Publisher)

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