Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Major parasitic zoonoses associated with dogs and cats in Europe


Baneth, G; Thamsborg, S M; Otranto, D; Guillot, J; Blaga, R; Deplazes, P; Solano-Gallego, L (2016). Major parasitic zoonoses associated with dogs and cats in Europe. Journal of Comparative Pathology, 155(1):S54-S74.

Abstract

Some of the most important zoonotic infectious diseases are associated with parasites transmitted from companion animals to man. This review describes the main parasitic zoonoses in Europe related to dogs and cats, with particular emphasis on their current epidemiology. Toxoplasmosis, leishmaniosis, giardiosis, echinococcosis, dirofilariosis and toxocariosis are described from the animal, as well as from the human host perspectives, with an emphasis on parasite life cycle, transmission, pathogenicity, prevention and identification of knowledge gaps. In addition, priorities for research and intervention in order to decrease the risks and burden of these diseases are presented. Preventing zoonotic parasitic infections requires an integrated multidisciplinary 'One Health' approach involving collaboration between veterinary and medical scientists, policy makers and public health officials.

Abstract

Some of the most important zoonotic infectious diseases are associated with parasites transmitted from companion animals to man. This review describes the main parasitic zoonoses in Europe related to dogs and cats, with particular emphasis on their current epidemiology. Toxoplasmosis, leishmaniosis, giardiosis, echinococcosis, dirofilariosis and toxocariosis are described from the animal, as well as from the human host perspectives, with an emphasis on parasite life cycle, transmission, pathogenicity, prevention and identification of knowledge gaps. In addition, priorities for research and intervention in order to decrease the risks and burden of these diseases are presented. Preventing zoonotic parasitic infections requires an integrated multidisciplinary 'One Health' approach involving collaboration between veterinary and medical scientists, policy makers and public health officials.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

117 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

204 downloads since deposited on 28 Dec 2015
13 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pathology and Forensic Medicine
Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:28 Dec 2015 11:02
Last Modified:11 Feb 2024 08:15
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0021-9975
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcpa.2015.10.179
PubMed ID:26687277
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)