Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Moving in a Moving World: A Review on Vestibular Motion Sickness


Bertolini, G; Straumann, D (2016). Moving in a Moving World: A Review on Vestibular Motion Sickness. Frontiers in Neurology, 7:14.

Abstract

Motion sickness is a common disturbance occurring in healthy people as a physiological response to exposure to motion stimuli that are unexpected on the basis of previous experience. The motion can be either real, and therefore perceived by the vestibular system, or illusory, as in the case of visual illusion. A multitude of studies has been performed in the last decades, substantiating different nauseogenic stimuli, studying their specific characteristics, proposing unifying theories, and testing possible countermeasures. Several reviews focused on one of these aspects; however, the link between specific nauseogenic stimuli and the unifying theories and models is often not clearly detailed. Readers unfamiliar with the topic, but studying a condition that may involve motion sickness, can therefore have difficulties to understand why a specific stimulus will induce motion sickness. So far, this general audience struggles to take advantage of the solid basis provided by existing theories and models. This review focuses on vestibular-only motion sickness, listing the relevant motion stimuli, clarifying the sensory signals involved, and framing them in the context of the current theories.

Abstract

Motion sickness is a common disturbance occurring in healthy people as a physiological response to exposure to motion stimuli that are unexpected on the basis of previous experience. The motion can be either real, and therefore perceived by the vestibular system, or illusory, as in the case of visual illusion. A multitude of studies has been performed in the last decades, substantiating different nauseogenic stimuli, studying their specific characteristics, proposing unifying theories, and testing possible countermeasures. Several reviews focused on one of these aspects; however, the link between specific nauseogenic stimuli and the unifying theories and models is often not clearly detailed. Readers unfamiliar with the topic, but studying a condition that may involve motion sickness, can therefore have difficulties to understand why a specific stimulus will induce motion sickness. So far, this general audience struggles to take advantage of the solid basis provided by existing theories and models. This review focuses on vestibular-only motion sickness, listing the relevant motion stimuli, clarifying the sensory signals involved, and framing them in the context of the current theories.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
15 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
12 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 17 Nov 2016
35 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:17 Nov 2016 13:01
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 10:04
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-2295
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2016.00014
PubMed ID:26913019

Download

Download PDF  'Moving in a Moving World: A Review on Vestibular Motion Sickness'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 378kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)