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The future of heart valve replacement: recent developments and translational challenges for heart valve tissue engineering


Fioretta, Emanuela S; Dijkman, Petra E; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Hoerstrup, Simon P (2018). The future of heart valve replacement: recent developments and translational challenges for heart valve tissue engineering. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, 12(1):e323-e335.

Abstract

Heart valve replacement is often the only solution for patients suffering from valvular heart disease. However, currently available valve replacements require either life-long anti-coagulation or are associated with valve degeneration and calcification. Moreover, they are suboptimal for young patients, because they do not adapt to the somatic growth. Tissue-engineering has been proposed as a promising approach to fulfill the urgent need for heart valve replacements with regenerative and growth capacity. This review will start with an overview on the currently available valve substitutes and the techniques for heart valve replacement. The main focus will be on the evolution of and different approaches for heart valve tissue-engineering, namely the in-vitro, in-vivo, and in-situ approach. More specifically, several heart valve tissue-engineering studies will be discussed with regard to their shortcomings or successes and their possible suitability for novel minimally invasive implantation techniques. As in-situ heart valve tissue engineering based on cell-free functionalized starter materials is considered to be a promising approach for clinical translation, this review will also analyze the techniques used to tune the inflammatory response and cell recruitment upon implantation in order to stir a favorable outcome: controlling the blood-material interface, regulating the cytokine release, and influencing cell adhesion and differentiation. In the last section the authors provide their opinion about the future developments and the challenges towards clinical translation and adaptation of heart valve tissue engineering for valve replacement.

Abstract

Heart valve replacement is often the only solution for patients suffering from valvular heart disease. However, currently available valve replacements require either life-long anti-coagulation or are associated with valve degeneration and calcification. Moreover, they are suboptimal for young patients, because they do not adapt to the somatic growth. Tissue-engineering has been proposed as a promising approach to fulfill the urgent need for heart valve replacements with regenerative and growth capacity. This review will start with an overview on the currently available valve substitutes and the techniques for heart valve replacement. The main focus will be on the evolution of and different approaches for heart valve tissue-engineering, namely the in-vitro, in-vivo, and in-situ approach. More specifically, several heart valve tissue-engineering studies will be discussed with regard to their shortcomings or successes and their possible suitability for novel minimally invasive implantation techniques. As in-situ heart valve tissue engineering based on cell-free functionalized starter materials is considered to be a promising approach for clinical translation, this review will also analyze the techniques used to tune the inflammatory response and cell recruitment upon implantation in order to stir a favorable outcome: controlling the blood-material interface, regulating the cytokine release, and influencing cell adhesion and differentiation. In the last section the authors provide their opinion about the future developments and the challenges towards clinical translation and adaptation of heart valve tissue engineering for valve replacement.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Medicine (miscellaneous), Biomaterials, Biomedical Engineering
Language:English
Date:January 2018
Deposited On:01 Feb 2018 09:46
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 04:47
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1932-6254
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/term.2326
PubMed ID:27696730

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