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Amyloid aggregation on lipid bilayers and its impact on membrane permeability


Friedman, R; Pellarin, R; Caflisch, A (2009). Amyloid aggregation on lipid bilayers and its impact on membrane permeability. Journal of Molecular Biology, 387(2):407-415.

Abstract

Fibrillar protein aggregates (amyloids) are involved in several common pathologies, e.g., Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Accumulating evidence suggests that toxicity in amyloid-related diseases originates from the deposition of protein aggregates on the cell membrane, which results in bilayer disruption and cell leakage. The molecular mechanism of damage to the membrane, however, is still obscure. To shed light on it we have performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of fibril-forming amphipathic peptides in the presence of lipid vesicles. The simulation results show that highly amyloidogenic peptides fibrillate on the surface of the vesicle, damaging the bilayer and promoting leakage. In contrast, the ordered aggregation of peptides with low amyloidogenicity is hindered by the vesicles. Remarkably, leakage from the vesicle is caused by growing aggregates, but not mature fibrils. The simulation results provide a basis for understanding the range of aggregation behavior that is observed in experiments with fibril-forming (poly)peptides.

Abstract

Fibrillar protein aggregates (amyloids) are involved in several common pathologies, e.g., Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Accumulating evidence suggests that toxicity in amyloid-related diseases originates from the deposition of protein aggregates on the cell membrane, which results in bilayer disruption and cell leakage. The molecular mechanism of damage to the membrane, however, is still obscure. To shed light on it we have performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of fibril-forming amphipathic peptides in the presence of lipid vesicles. The simulation results show that highly amyloidogenic peptides fibrillate on the surface of the vesicle, damaging the bilayer and promoting leakage. In contrast, the ordered aggregation of peptides with low amyloidogenicity is hindered by the vesicles. Remarkably, leakage from the vesicle is caused by growing aggregates, but not mature fibrils. The simulation results provide a basis for understanding the range of aggregation behavior that is observed in experiments with fibril-forming (poly)peptides.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:24 December 2009
Deposited On:10 Feb 2009 10:32
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 22:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-2836
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2008.12.036
PubMed ID:19133272

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