Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Structural studies of fragments of G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands by NMR


Neumoin, Alexey. Structural studies of fragments of G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands by NMR. 2009, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

Summary In the course of my doctoral studies I characterized the structure and dynamics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCRs) fragments and their ligands by high-resolution NMR. The receptors of the GPCR family are transmembrane proteins of prime biological importance. All members of this family possess similar architecture of seven membrane- spanning α-helices and are involved in various signal transduction processes. First part of my work is devoted to the investigation of the structural determinants of the GPCR ligand peptide YY and monitoring the folding process of this peptide in solution. PYY is a 36- residue C-terminally amidated polypeptide that belongs to the neuropeptide Y family of peptide hormones. These molecules are involved in the regulation of a variety of physiological processes, such as for example food uptake. In the second part of my thesis I directed my efforts towards elucidation of the structure and probing the dynamic properties of the transmembrane fragments of the GPCRs in native-like environments. The subject of my studies was the -factor G-protein coupled Ste2p receptor, which is involved in sensing pheromones in yeast. Two large polypeptide fragments including the first and the second (peptide TM1TM2) and the seventh (peptide TM7) transmembrane domains of the Ste2p receptor were structurally characterized in micellar solution. The obtained results provide important insights into the GPCR architecture in a membrane bilayer. In the first part of my work I focused on the structural determinants and the folding process of the peptide YY (PYY) in solution. Some of the peptides from neuropeptide Y family adopt a well-defined hairpin structure in water that was first shown for avian pancreatic peptide (aPP) using X-ray crystallography. This helical hairpin is commonly referred to as PP-fold and is characterized by a N-terminal polyproline helix, which is back- folded via a -turn onto a C-terminal -helix. The solution structure of the PYY displayed a highly similar helical hairpin, however in the highly homologous neuropeptide Y we were surprised by the absence of the tertiary structure. To investigate the significance of the tertiary contacts, Tyr and Pro residues at the hydrophobic interface of the hairpin- type structure of PYY were replaced by Ala residues, and the conformational and dynamical properties of the resulting peptides were analyzed by high-resolution NMR

spectroscopy. Previously we established the 15N{1H}-NOE as a convenient method to quantify the extent of back-folding. A comparison of the data from different Ala mutant peptides to those of native PYY nicely reflected the differences in backbone rigidity of the N-terminus. Most of the Pro->Ala or the Tyr->Ala mutants possessed increased backbone dynamics, and the differences in N-terminal mobility among them reflected various degrees to which they sample conformations close to the PP-fold. By varying temperature or the methanol content of the aqueous solvent and monitoring chemical shifts we followed the residue-specific formation of tertiary contacts while changing the physical or chemical

environment. The PYY peptide in methanol solution was characterized both by determining its solution structure as well as by its internal backbone dynamics as derived from 15N relaxation data. The latter is

characterized by a complete loss of tertiary structure. Chemical shifts of C α in the heat-denaturation

experiments displayed sigmoidal curves with very similar points of inflection indicating that both

secondary as well as tertiary structure in the heat denaturation was lost synchronously.

The results suggest that helical hairpin formation in PYY peptide is both reversible and cooperative and that specific N- and C-terminal tertiary hydrophobic contacts between the polyproline and the -helix promote the folding process. In addition, structural analysis of substitutions in the turn region indicates that the loop does not constrain the hairpin structure. The results may also have implications for our understanding of the binding of these peptides to their receptors. In the second part of the thesis the structure and dynamics of two large fragments of Ste2p the G-protein coupled -factor receptor from yeast were investigated. Both GPCR fragments were expressed and purified by our colleagues from the group of Prof. Fred Naider (College of Staten Island, NY). At first I investigated the 73-residue (Ste2p(267-339)) peptide TM7 consisting of the 3rd extracellular loop, the 7th transmembrane helix and 40 residues from the cytosolic C-terminal domain in dodecylphosphocholine micelles using solution NMR spectroscopy. The structure revealed the presence of an -helix in the segment encompassing residues 10 to 30, which was

perturbed around the internal Pro24 residue. 15N-relaxation and RDC data supported a rather stable fold for the transmembrane part of TM7, whereas the exposed segments were more flexible. Spin-label data indicated that the TM7 helix was integrated into dodecylphosphocholine micelles, but displayed flexibility around the internal Pro24 site, exposing residues 22 to 26 to solution and revealed a second site of interaction with the micelle within a region comprising residues 43-58, which formed part of a less well- defined nascent helix. Further I extended my work on a single membrane-spanning TM7 fragment to a longer 80-residue (Ste2p(31-110)) double membrane-spanning peptide TM1TM2, consisting of 19 residues from the N-terminal domain, the 1st transmembrane helix, the first cytoplasmic loop, the second transmembrane helix and 7 residues from the first extracellular loop of the Ste2p receptor. Because of the larger complexity of a double membrane-spanning fragment different isotope labeling patterns were utilized including

[15N], [15N, 13C], [15N, 13C, 2H]-labeled and selectively [15N]-labeled at specific amino acid residues or protonated only at selected methyl groups peptides. The structure of TM1TM2 peptide in lyso-palmitoylphosphatidylglycerol micelles revealed the presence of three -helices encompassing residues 39-47, 49-72 and 80-103, with higher flexibility around the internal Arg58 site of the first transmembrane domain. Several long-range interhelical NOE connectivities supported the folding of TM1TM2 into a tertiary structure forming a crossed helix that splays apart toward the extracellular regions and contains

56 60 15 considerable flexibility in the G VRSG region. N-relaxation and hydrogen- deuterium exchange data support a stable fold for the transmembrane parts of TM1TM2, whereas the solvent-exposed segments were more flexible. Interestingly the NMR structure was consistent with the results of biochemical experiments that identified the ligand binding site within this region of the receptor. The results obtained during my Ph.D. studies reveal important aspects of the GPCR ligand peptide PYY structure and folding in solution so as shed light on the structure of large fragments of yeast pheromone receptor Ste2p in native-like micellar environment. Im Laufe meiner Promotion habe ich die Struktur und Dynamik von G-Protein- gekoppelte Rezeptor- (GPCRs) Fragmenten und ihren Liganden mittels hochauflösender NMR charakterisiert. Die Rezeptoren der GPCR-Familie sind Transmembran-Proteine von zentraler biologischer Bedeutung. Alle Mitglieder dieser Familie besitzen eine ähnliche Architektur mit sieben transmembranären α-Helices, und nehmen in verschiedenen Signaltransduktionsprozessen teil. Der erste Teil meiner Arbeit widmet sich der Untersuchung der strukturellen Determinanten des GPCR Liganden Peptid YY und der Verfolgung des Faltungsprozesses dieses Peptids in Lösung. PYY ist ein Polypeptid mit 36 Aminosäuren und C-terminaler Amidierung, das zu der Neuropeptid Y-Familie von Peptid-Hormonen gehört. Diese Moleküle sind in der Regulation einer Vielzahl physiologischer Prozesse involviert, wie zum Beispiel bei der Lebensmittelaufnahme. Im zweiten Teil meiner Arbeit richtete ich meine Bemühungen auf die Aufklärung der Struktur und die dynamischen Eigenschaften der Transmembran-Fragmente der GPCRs in nativen Bedingungen. Das Thema meiner Studien war der α-Faktor G-Protein-gekoppelter Rezeptor Ste2p, der involviert in der Pheromonerkennung in Hefe ist. Zwei große Polypeptid-Fragmente, bestehend aus der ersten und zweiten (Peptid TM1TM2) und der siebten Transmembran-Domän (Peptid TM7) des Ste2p-Rezeptors, wurden in micellärer Lösung strukturell charakterisiert. Die Ergebnisse liefern wichtige Einblicke in die GPCR-Architektur in einem Membran- Bilayer. Im ersten Teil meiner Arbeit konzentrierte ich mich auf die strukturellen Faktoren und den Faltungsprozess des Peptid YY (PYY) in Lösung. Einige der Peptide aus Neuropeptid Y-Familie haben eine klar definierte hairpin-Struktur in Wasser; diese wurde zum ersten Mal gezeigt für das Avian Pankreas-Peptid mittels Röntgenstrahl- Kristallographie. Dieser helikale ‘hairpin’ wird gemeinhin als PP-fold bezeichnet und besteht aus einer N-terminalen Polyprolin-Helix, die zurückfaltet über einen β-turn auf eine C-terminale α-Helix. Die Lösungsstruktur des PYY zeigt einen sehr ähnlichen helikalen ‘hairpin’, jedoch im hoch-homologen Neuropeptid Y beobachteten wir zu unserem Erstauenen keine Tertiärstruktur. Um die Bedeutung der tertiären Kontakte zu untersuchen, wurden Tyr- und Pro-Reste an der hydrophoben Oberfläche der ‘hairpin’- Struktur von PYY ersetzt durch Alanin und die konformationellen und dynamischen Eigenschaften der resultierenden Peptide wurden analysiert mittels hochauflösender

NMR-Spektroskopie. Zuvor haben wir die 15N{1H}-NOE als eine passende Methode zur Quantifizierung des Umfangs der Rückfaltung etabliert. Ein Vergleich der Daten aus unterschiedlichen Ala-Peptid- Mutanten mit dem nativen PYY spiegelt schön die Unterschiede in der Steifheit des ‘backbones’ des N-Terminus wieder. Die meisten der Pro-> Ala oder der Tyr-> Ala Mutanten besaßen eine erhöhte ‘backbone’-Dynamik, und die Unterschiede in der N-terminalen Mobilität unter ihnen spiegelt verschiedene Grade wieder, zu dem sie Probe Konformationen annimmt, die dem ‘PP-fold’ ähneln. Durch Variation der Temperatur oder des Methanolgehalts des wässrigen Lösungsmittels und Verfolgung des ‘chemical shift’ konnten wir die aminosäure- spezifische Bildung der Tertiärkontakte während der Änderung der physikalischen oder chemischen Umgebung verfolgen. Das PYY Peptid in Methanollösung wurde charakterisiert sowohl durch die Bestimmung seiner Lösungsstruktur als auch durch

15 ihre interne ‘backbone’-Dynamik mittels N-relaxation-Daten. Die ‘backbone’- Dynamik zeichnet sich durch einen vollständigen Verlust der tertiären Struktur aus. Die ‘Chemical shifts’ der Cα in den Hitze-Denaturierungs-Experimenten zeigten sigmoidale Kurven mit sehr ähnliche Wendepunkten, was darauf hinweist, dass sowohl Sekundär- als auch Tertiärstruktur in der Hitzedenaturierung synchron verloren werden. Die Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass die Bildung des helikalen ‘hairpin’ im PYY Peptid reversibel und kooperativ ist und dass spezifische N-und C-terminale hydrophobe Tertiärkontakte zwischen der Polyprolinhelix und der α-Helix den Faltungsprozess fördern. Darüber hinaus deutet die Strukturanalyse von Substitutionen in der ‘turn’-Region darauf hin, dass der ‘loop’ die ‘hairpin’-Struktur nicht hemmt. Die Ergebnisse können auch Auswirkungen für unser Verständnis der Bindung dieser Peptide auf ihren Rezeptoren haben. Im zweiten Teil der Dissertation wurde die Struktur und Dynamik von zwei großen Fragmenten von Ste2p, dem G-Protein-gekoppelten α-Faktor-Rezeptor von Hefe untersucht. Beide GPCR-Fragmente wurden exprimiert und aufgereinigt von unseren Kollegen aus der Arbeitsgruppe von Prof. Fred Naider (College of Staten Island, NY). Zuerst untersuchte ich das 73-aminosäure-Peptid TM7 (Ste2p (267-339)) bestehend aus dem dritten extrazellulären ‘loop’, der siebten Transmembran-Helix und 40 Aminosäuren aus der zytosolische C-terminalen Domäne in Dodecylphosphocholin- Micellen mittels NMR-Spektroskopie. Die Struktur offenbarte die Anwesenheit einer α- Helix im Segment von Aminosäurerest 10 bis 30, die um das interne Pro24 gestört

wird. 15N-relaxation und RDC-Daten unterstützten einen recht stabilen ‘fold’ für den Transmembran-Anteil des TM7, hingegen die ausgesetzten Segmente waren flexibler. Die Spin-Label-Daten weisten darauf hin, dass die TM7-Helix in die Dodecylphosphocholin-Micellen integriert wurde, aber zeigten Flexibilität rund um das interne Pro24, da die Aminosäuren 22 bis 26 in die Lösung zeigen, desweiteren zeigten sie einen zweiten Interaktionsort mit der Micelle innerhalb der Region von Aminosäurerest 43 bis 58, die einen Teil einer weniger gut definierten im Entstehen begriffenen Helix bildet. Im weiteren verlängerte ich meine Arbeit an einem einfachen Transmembran-Fragment TM7 zu einem längeren 80-Aminosäure-Doppel- Transmembran-Peptid TM1TM2 (Ste2p (31-110)), bestehend vom 19 Aminosäuren aus der N-terminalen Domäne, die erste Transmembran-Helix, der erste zytoplasmatische ‘loop’, die zweite Transmembran-Helix und 7 Aminosäuren aus dem ersten extrazellulären ‘loop’ des Ste2p-Rezeptors. Aufgrund der größeren Komplexität des doppelten Transmembran-Fragments wurden verschiedene Isotopen-Labeling-

Muster genutzt: [15N], [15N, 13C], [15N, 13C, 2H]-markiert und selektiv [15N]- markiert an bestimmten Aminosäuren oder protoniert nur an ausgewählten Methyl- G r u p p en - P ep tid en . D ie S tr u k tu r d es TM 1 TM 2 - P ep tid s in LY S O - palmitoylphosphatidylglycerol-Micellen zeigte das Vorhandensein von drei α-Helices, von Aminosäure 39-47, 49-72 und 80-103, mit einer größeren Flexibilität rund um das interne Arg58 der ersten Transmembran-Domäne. Mehrere ‘long range-interhelical NOE’ Verbindungen unterstützen die Faltung von TM1TM2 in eine Tertiärstruktur, die eine gekreuzte Helix bildet, die sich ausdehnt in Richtung der extrazellulären Regionen

56 60 15 und die erhebliche Flexibilität in der G VRSG Region enthält. N-relaxation- und Wasserstoff-Deuterium-Austausch-Daten unterstützten einen stabilen ‘fold’ für die Transmembran-Teile von TM1TM2, während die lösungsmittel-exponierten Segmente flexibler waren. Interessanterweise ist die NMR-Struktur im Einklang mit den Ergebnissen der biochemischen Experimente, die die Ligandenbindungsort in dieser Region des Rezeptors identifizierten. Die erzielten Ergebnisse während meiner Promotionsstudien zeigen wichtige Aspekte der GPCR-Peptid-Liganden PYY-Struktur und seiner Faltung in der Lösung, sowie geben sie Aufschluss über die Struktur der großen Fragmente des Hefe- Pheromon-Rezeptor Ste2p in nativer Micellenumgebung.

Abstract

Summary In the course of my doctoral studies I characterized the structure and dynamics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCRs) fragments and their ligands by high-resolution NMR. The receptors of the GPCR family are transmembrane proteins of prime biological importance. All members of this family possess similar architecture of seven membrane- spanning α-helices and are involved in various signal transduction processes. First part of my work is devoted to the investigation of the structural determinants of the GPCR ligand peptide YY and monitoring the folding process of this peptide in solution. PYY is a 36- residue C-terminally amidated polypeptide that belongs to the neuropeptide Y family of peptide hormones. These molecules are involved in the regulation of a variety of physiological processes, such as for example food uptake. In the second part of my thesis I directed my efforts towards elucidation of the structure and probing the dynamic properties of the transmembrane fragments of the GPCRs in native-like environments. The subject of my studies was the -factor G-protein coupled Ste2p receptor, which is involved in sensing pheromones in yeast. Two large polypeptide fragments including the first and the second (peptide TM1TM2) and the seventh (peptide TM7) transmembrane domains of the Ste2p receptor were structurally characterized in micellar solution. The obtained results provide important insights into the GPCR architecture in a membrane bilayer. In the first part of my work I focused on the structural determinants and the folding process of the peptide YY (PYY) in solution. Some of the peptides from neuropeptide Y family adopt a well-defined hairpin structure in water that was first shown for avian pancreatic peptide (aPP) using X-ray crystallography. This helical hairpin is commonly referred to as PP-fold and is characterized by a N-terminal polyproline helix, which is back- folded via a -turn onto a C-terminal -helix. The solution structure of the PYY displayed a highly similar helical hairpin, however in the highly homologous neuropeptide Y we were surprised by the absence of the tertiary structure. To investigate the significance of the tertiary contacts, Tyr and Pro residues at the hydrophobic interface of the hairpin- type structure of PYY were replaced by Ala residues, and the conformational and dynamical properties of the resulting peptides were analyzed by high-resolution NMR

spectroscopy. Previously we established the 15N{1H}-NOE as a convenient method to quantify the extent of back-folding. A comparison of the data from different Ala mutant peptides to those of native PYY nicely reflected the differences in backbone rigidity of the N-terminus. Most of the Pro->Ala or the Tyr->Ala mutants possessed increased backbone dynamics, and the differences in N-terminal mobility among them reflected various degrees to which they sample conformations close to the PP-fold. By varying temperature or the methanol content of the aqueous solvent and monitoring chemical shifts we followed the residue-specific formation of tertiary contacts while changing the physical or chemical

environment. The PYY peptide in methanol solution was characterized both by determining its solution structure as well as by its internal backbone dynamics as derived from 15N relaxation data. The latter is

characterized by a complete loss of tertiary structure. Chemical shifts of C α in the heat-denaturation

experiments displayed sigmoidal curves with very similar points of inflection indicating that both

secondary as well as tertiary structure in the heat denaturation was lost synchronously.

The results suggest that helical hairpin formation in PYY peptide is both reversible and cooperative and that specific N- and C-terminal tertiary hydrophobic contacts between the polyproline and the -helix promote the folding process. In addition, structural analysis of substitutions in the turn region indicates that the loop does not constrain the hairpin structure. The results may also have implications for our understanding of the binding of these peptides to their receptors. In the second part of the thesis the structure and dynamics of two large fragments of Ste2p the G-protein coupled -factor receptor from yeast were investigated. Both GPCR fragments were expressed and purified by our colleagues from the group of Prof. Fred Naider (College of Staten Island, NY). At first I investigated the 73-residue (Ste2p(267-339)) peptide TM7 consisting of the 3rd extracellular loop, the 7th transmembrane helix and 40 residues from the cytosolic C-terminal domain in dodecylphosphocholine micelles using solution NMR spectroscopy. The structure revealed the presence of an -helix in the segment encompassing residues 10 to 30, which was

perturbed around the internal Pro24 residue. 15N-relaxation and RDC data supported a rather stable fold for the transmembrane part of TM7, whereas the exposed segments were more flexible. Spin-label data indicated that the TM7 helix was integrated into dodecylphosphocholine micelles, but displayed flexibility around the internal Pro24 site, exposing residues 22 to 26 to solution and revealed a second site of interaction with the micelle within a region comprising residues 43-58, which formed part of a less well- defined nascent helix. Further I extended my work on a single membrane-spanning TM7 fragment to a longer 80-residue (Ste2p(31-110)) double membrane-spanning peptide TM1TM2, consisting of 19 residues from the N-terminal domain, the 1st transmembrane helix, the first cytoplasmic loop, the second transmembrane helix and 7 residues from the first extracellular loop of the Ste2p receptor. Because of the larger complexity of a double membrane-spanning fragment different isotope labeling patterns were utilized including

[15N], [15N, 13C], [15N, 13C, 2H]-labeled and selectively [15N]-labeled at specific amino acid residues or protonated only at selected methyl groups peptides. The structure of TM1TM2 peptide in lyso-palmitoylphosphatidylglycerol micelles revealed the presence of three -helices encompassing residues 39-47, 49-72 and 80-103, with higher flexibility around the internal Arg58 site of the first transmembrane domain. Several long-range interhelical NOE connectivities supported the folding of TM1TM2 into a tertiary structure forming a crossed helix that splays apart toward the extracellular regions and contains

56 60 15 considerable flexibility in the G VRSG region. N-relaxation and hydrogen- deuterium exchange data support a stable fold for the transmembrane parts of TM1TM2, whereas the solvent-exposed segments were more flexible. Interestingly the NMR structure was consistent with the results of biochemical experiments that identified the ligand binding site within this region of the receptor. The results obtained during my Ph.D. studies reveal important aspects of the GPCR ligand peptide PYY structure and folding in solution so as shed light on the structure of large fragments of yeast pheromone receptor Ste2p in native-like micellar environment. Im Laufe meiner Promotion habe ich die Struktur und Dynamik von G-Protein- gekoppelte Rezeptor- (GPCRs) Fragmenten und ihren Liganden mittels hochauflösender NMR charakterisiert. Die Rezeptoren der GPCR-Familie sind Transmembran-Proteine von zentraler biologischer Bedeutung. Alle Mitglieder dieser Familie besitzen eine ähnliche Architektur mit sieben transmembranären α-Helices, und nehmen in verschiedenen Signaltransduktionsprozessen teil. Der erste Teil meiner Arbeit widmet sich der Untersuchung der strukturellen Determinanten des GPCR Liganden Peptid YY und der Verfolgung des Faltungsprozesses dieses Peptids in Lösung. PYY ist ein Polypeptid mit 36 Aminosäuren und C-terminaler Amidierung, das zu der Neuropeptid Y-Familie von Peptid-Hormonen gehört. Diese Moleküle sind in der Regulation einer Vielzahl physiologischer Prozesse involviert, wie zum Beispiel bei der Lebensmittelaufnahme. Im zweiten Teil meiner Arbeit richtete ich meine Bemühungen auf die Aufklärung der Struktur und die dynamischen Eigenschaften der Transmembran-Fragmente der GPCRs in nativen Bedingungen. Das Thema meiner Studien war der α-Faktor G-Protein-gekoppelter Rezeptor Ste2p, der involviert in der Pheromonerkennung in Hefe ist. Zwei große Polypeptid-Fragmente, bestehend aus der ersten und zweiten (Peptid TM1TM2) und der siebten Transmembran-Domän (Peptid TM7) des Ste2p-Rezeptors, wurden in micellärer Lösung strukturell charakterisiert. Die Ergebnisse liefern wichtige Einblicke in die GPCR-Architektur in einem Membran- Bilayer. Im ersten Teil meiner Arbeit konzentrierte ich mich auf die strukturellen Faktoren und den Faltungsprozess des Peptid YY (PYY) in Lösung. Einige der Peptide aus Neuropeptid Y-Familie haben eine klar definierte hairpin-Struktur in Wasser; diese wurde zum ersten Mal gezeigt für das Avian Pankreas-Peptid mittels Röntgenstrahl- Kristallographie. Dieser helikale ‘hairpin’ wird gemeinhin als PP-fold bezeichnet und besteht aus einer N-terminalen Polyprolin-Helix, die zurückfaltet über einen β-turn auf eine C-terminale α-Helix. Die Lösungsstruktur des PYY zeigt einen sehr ähnlichen helikalen ‘hairpin’, jedoch im hoch-homologen Neuropeptid Y beobachteten wir zu unserem Erstauenen keine Tertiärstruktur. Um die Bedeutung der tertiären Kontakte zu untersuchen, wurden Tyr- und Pro-Reste an der hydrophoben Oberfläche der ‘hairpin’- Struktur von PYY ersetzt durch Alanin und die konformationellen und dynamischen Eigenschaften der resultierenden Peptide wurden analysiert mittels hochauflösender

NMR-Spektroskopie. Zuvor haben wir die 15N{1H}-NOE als eine passende Methode zur Quantifizierung des Umfangs der Rückfaltung etabliert. Ein Vergleich der Daten aus unterschiedlichen Ala-Peptid- Mutanten mit dem nativen PYY spiegelt schön die Unterschiede in der Steifheit des ‘backbones’ des N-Terminus wieder. Die meisten der Pro-> Ala oder der Tyr-> Ala Mutanten besaßen eine erhöhte ‘backbone’-Dynamik, und die Unterschiede in der N-terminalen Mobilität unter ihnen spiegelt verschiedene Grade wieder, zu dem sie Probe Konformationen annimmt, die dem ‘PP-fold’ ähneln. Durch Variation der Temperatur oder des Methanolgehalts des wässrigen Lösungsmittels und Verfolgung des ‘chemical shift’ konnten wir die aminosäure- spezifische Bildung der Tertiärkontakte während der Änderung der physikalischen oder chemischen Umgebung verfolgen. Das PYY Peptid in Methanollösung wurde charakterisiert sowohl durch die Bestimmung seiner Lösungsstruktur als auch durch

15 ihre interne ‘backbone’-Dynamik mittels N-relaxation-Daten. Die ‘backbone’- Dynamik zeichnet sich durch einen vollständigen Verlust der tertiären Struktur aus. Die ‘Chemical shifts’ der Cα in den Hitze-Denaturierungs-Experimenten zeigten sigmoidale Kurven mit sehr ähnliche Wendepunkten, was darauf hinweist, dass sowohl Sekundär- als auch Tertiärstruktur in der Hitzedenaturierung synchron verloren werden. Die Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass die Bildung des helikalen ‘hairpin’ im PYY Peptid reversibel und kooperativ ist und dass spezifische N-und C-terminale hydrophobe Tertiärkontakte zwischen der Polyprolinhelix und der α-Helix den Faltungsprozess fördern. Darüber hinaus deutet die Strukturanalyse von Substitutionen in der ‘turn’-Region darauf hin, dass der ‘loop’ die ‘hairpin’-Struktur nicht hemmt. Die Ergebnisse können auch Auswirkungen für unser Verständnis der Bindung dieser Peptide auf ihren Rezeptoren haben. Im zweiten Teil der Dissertation wurde die Struktur und Dynamik von zwei großen Fragmenten von Ste2p, dem G-Protein-gekoppelten α-Faktor-Rezeptor von Hefe untersucht. Beide GPCR-Fragmente wurden exprimiert und aufgereinigt von unseren Kollegen aus der Arbeitsgruppe von Prof. Fred Naider (College of Staten Island, NY). Zuerst untersuchte ich das 73-aminosäure-Peptid TM7 (Ste2p (267-339)) bestehend aus dem dritten extrazellulären ‘loop’, der siebten Transmembran-Helix und 40 Aminosäuren aus der zytosolische C-terminalen Domäne in Dodecylphosphocholin- Micellen mittels NMR-Spektroskopie. Die Struktur offenbarte die Anwesenheit einer α- Helix im Segment von Aminosäurerest 10 bis 30, die um das interne Pro24 gestört

wird. 15N-relaxation und RDC-Daten unterstützten einen recht stabilen ‘fold’ für den Transmembran-Anteil des TM7, hingegen die ausgesetzten Segmente waren flexibler. Die Spin-Label-Daten weisten darauf hin, dass die TM7-Helix in die Dodecylphosphocholin-Micellen integriert wurde, aber zeigten Flexibilität rund um das interne Pro24, da die Aminosäuren 22 bis 26 in die Lösung zeigen, desweiteren zeigten sie einen zweiten Interaktionsort mit der Micelle innerhalb der Region von Aminosäurerest 43 bis 58, die einen Teil einer weniger gut definierten im Entstehen begriffenen Helix bildet. Im weiteren verlängerte ich meine Arbeit an einem einfachen Transmembran-Fragment TM7 zu einem längeren 80-Aminosäure-Doppel- Transmembran-Peptid TM1TM2 (Ste2p (31-110)), bestehend vom 19 Aminosäuren aus der N-terminalen Domäne, die erste Transmembran-Helix, der erste zytoplasmatische ‘loop’, die zweite Transmembran-Helix und 7 Aminosäuren aus dem ersten extrazellulären ‘loop’ des Ste2p-Rezeptors. Aufgrund der größeren Komplexität des doppelten Transmembran-Fragments wurden verschiedene Isotopen-Labeling-

Muster genutzt: [15N], [15N, 13C], [15N, 13C, 2H]-markiert und selektiv [15N]- markiert an bestimmten Aminosäuren oder protoniert nur an ausgewählten Methyl- G r u p p en - P ep tid en . D ie S tr u k tu r d es TM 1 TM 2 - P ep tid s in LY S O - palmitoylphosphatidylglycerol-Micellen zeigte das Vorhandensein von drei α-Helices, von Aminosäure 39-47, 49-72 und 80-103, mit einer größeren Flexibilität rund um das interne Arg58 der ersten Transmembran-Domäne. Mehrere ‘long range-interhelical NOE’ Verbindungen unterstützen die Faltung von TM1TM2 in eine Tertiärstruktur, die eine gekreuzte Helix bildet, die sich ausdehnt in Richtung der extrazellulären Regionen

56 60 15 und die erhebliche Flexibilität in der G VRSG Region enthält. N-relaxation- und Wasserstoff-Deuterium-Austausch-Daten unterstützten einen stabilen ‘fold’ für die Transmembran-Teile von TM1TM2, während die lösungsmittel-exponierten Segmente flexibler waren. Interessanterweise ist die NMR-Struktur im Einklang mit den Ergebnissen der biochemischen Experimente, die die Ligandenbindungsort in dieser Region des Rezeptors identifizierten. Die erzielten Ergebnisse während meiner Promotionsstudien zeigen wichtige Aspekte der GPCR-Peptid-Liganden PYY-Struktur und seiner Faltung in der Lösung, sowie geben sie Aufschluss über die Struktur der großen Fragmente des Hefe- Pheromon-Rezeptor Ste2p in nativer Micellenumgebung.

Statistics

Downloads

6 downloads since deposited on 06 Feb 2009
6 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (monographical)
Referees:Robinson John Anthony, Luedtke Nathan
Communities & Collections:UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:2009
Deposited On:06 Feb 2009 15:05
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 15:54
Number of Pages:219
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=ebi01_prod005797491&context=L&vid=ZAD&search_scope=default_scope&tab=default_tab&lang=de_DE (Library Catalogue)

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Structural studies of fragments of G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands by NMR'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 19MB