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Nogo-A regulates vascular network architecture in the postnatal brain


Wälchli, Thomas; Ulmann-Schuler, Alexandra; Hintermüller, Christoph; Meyer, Eric; Stampanoni, Marco; Carmeliet, Peter; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Bozinov, Oliver; Regli, Luca; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes; Hoerstrup, Simon P (2017). Nogo-A regulates vascular network architecture in the postnatal brain. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37(2):614-631.

Abstract

Recently, we discovered a new role for the well-known axonal growth inhibitory molecule Nogo-A as a negative regulator of angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system. However, how Nogo-A affected the three-dimensional (3D) central nervous system (CNS) vascular network architecture remained unknown. Here, using vascular corrosion casting, hierarchical, synchrotron radiation μCT-based network imaging and computer-aided network analysis, we found that genetic ablation of Nogo-A significantly increased the three-dimensional vascular volume fraction in the postnatal day 10 (P10) mouse brain. More detailed analysis of the cerebral cortex revealed that this effect was mainly due to an increased number of capillaries and capillary branchpoints. Interestingly, other vascular parameters such as vessel diameter, -length, -tortuosity, and -volume were comparable between both genotypes for non-capillary vessels and capillaries. Taken together, our three-dimensional data showing more vessel segments and branchpoints at unchanged vessel morphology suggest that stimulated angiogenesis upon Nogo-A gene deletion results in the insertion of complete capillary micro-networks and not just single vessels into existing vascular networks. These findings significantly enhance our understanding of how angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, and three-dimensional vessel network architecture are regulated during central nervous system development. Nogo-A may therefore be a potential novel target for angiogenesis-dependent central nervous system pathologies such as brain tumors or stroke.

Abstract

Recently, we discovered a new role for the well-known axonal growth inhibitory molecule Nogo-A as a negative regulator of angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system. However, how Nogo-A affected the three-dimensional (3D) central nervous system (CNS) vascular network architecture remained unknown. Here, using vascular corrosion casting, hierarchical, synchrotron radiation μCT-based network imaging and computer-aided network analysis, we found that genetic ablation of Nogo-A significantly increased the three-dimensional vascular volume fraction in the postnatal day 10 (P10) mouse brain. More detailed analysis of the cerebral cortex revealed that this effect was mainly due to an increased number of capillaries and capillary branchpoints. Interestingly, other vascular parameters such as vessel diameter, -length, -tortuosity, and -volume were comparable between both genotypes for non-capillary vessels and capillaries. Taken together, our three-dimensional data showing more vessel segments and branchpoints at unchanged vessel morphology suggest that stimulated angiogenesis upon Nogo-A gene deletion results in the insertion of complete capillary micro-networks and not just single vessels into existing vascular networks. These findings significantly enhance our understanding of how angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, and three-dimensional vessel network architecture are regulated during central nervous system development. Nogo-A may therefore be a potential novel target for angiogenesis-dependent central nervous system pathologies such as brain tumors or stroke.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:21 Dec 2016 15:35
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 07:28
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0271-678X
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X16675182
PubMed ID:27927704

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