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Humidification of indoor air for preventing or reducing dryness symptoms or upper respiratory infections in educational settings and at the workplace


Byber, Katarzyna; Flatz, Aline; Norbäck, Dan; Hitzke, Christine; Imo, David; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Puhan, Milo Alan; Dressel, Holger; Mütsch, Margot (2016). Humidification of indoor air for preventing or reducing dryness symptoms or upper respiratory infections in educational settings and at the workplace. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 6:CD012219.

Abstract

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:

To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions that increase indoor air humidity to prevent or reduce dryness symptoms of the eyes, the skin and the upper respiratory tract (URT) or URT infections at work and in educational settings.
Background

Following the progress of industrialisation, workplaces have increasingly moved from outdoor to indoor locations. This shift has changed the spectrum of conditions to which workers are exposed. This fact is not only relevant to the adult working population, but also to children and young adults, as they stay indoors for a significant part of the day throughout their education (Angelon‐Gaetz 2014; Jaakkola 1991; Seppanen 2002). At most workplaces, indoor air is a predefined condition. Its components vary considerably among different occupational and educational settings. Emissions from indoor sources like building materials, furnishings, office equipment and human activities result in the release of dust as well as chemical and biological compounds. Following natural ventilation, outdoor factors, such as pollen and particulate matters, may also contribute to indoor air quality (Alsmo 2014). Indoor air climate results from a combination of four physical parameters: temperature, radiation temperature, air velocity and humidity. Humidity is defined as absolute humidity (water vapour content of the air) whilst relative humidity (RH) is the ratio of vapour pressure and saturation vapour pressure. RH, expressed as a percentage, increases relative to a decrease in temperature. A humidity level of 100% means that the air is completely saturated with water vapour. The influence of different humidity levels on pathogens, allergens and chemical factors is presented in Figure 1 (Alsmo 2014).

Abstract

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:

To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions that increase indoor air humidity to prevent or reduce dryness symptoms of the eyes, the skin and the upper respiratory tract (URT) or URT infections at work and in educational settings.
Background

Following the progress of industrialisation, workplaces have increasingly moved from outdoor to indoor locations. This shift has changed the spectrum of conditions to which workers are exposed. This fact is not only relevant to the adult working population, but also to children and young adults, as they stay indoors for a significant part of the day throughout their education (Angelon‐Gaetz 2014; Jaakkola 1991; Seppanen 2002). At most workplaces, indoor air is a predefined condition. Its components vary considerably among different occupational and educational settings. Emissions from indoor sources like building materials, furnishings, office equipment and human activities result in the release of dust as well as chemical and biological compounds. Following natural ventilation, outdoor factors, such as pollen and particulate matters, may also contribute to indoor air quality (Alsmo 2014). Indoor air climate results from a combination of four physical parameters: temperature, radiation temperature, air velocity and humidity. Humidity is defined as absolute humidity (water vapour content of the air) whilst relative humidity (RH) is the ratio of vapour pressure and saturation vapour pressure. RH, expressed as a percentage, increases relative to a decrease in temperature. A humidity level of 100% means that the air is completely saturated with water vapour. The influence of different humidity levels on pathogens, allergens and chemical factors is presented in Figure 1 (Alsmo 2014).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:13 Jan 2017 08:50
Last Modified:14 Jan 2022 15:05
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1361-6137
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD012219
Related URLs:https://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/212286/

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