Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Catheter interventional treatment of congenital portosystemic venous shunts in childhood


Knirsch, Walter; Benz, Dominik C; Bühr, Patrick; Quandt, Daniel; Weber, Roland; Kellenberger, Christian; Braegger, Christian P; Kretschmar, Oliver (2016). Catheter interventional treatment of congenital portosystemic venous shunts in childhood. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, 87(7):1281-1292.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The study aimed on the catheter interventional treatment of congenital portosystemic venous shunt (CPSVS) in childhood and the impact on vascular growth of hypoplastic portal veins. Clinical course and follow up of partial or complete closure of CPSVS are described.
BACKGROUND: CPSVS is a very rare vascular malformation of the portal venous drainage resulting in potentially life threatening abdominal, pulmonary, cerebral, and cardiac complications. The anatomic type, clinical course, and diagnosis must be determined for optimal management.
METHODS: Single centre case series.
RESULTS: Eight (6 female) children with extrahepatic (n = 5) and intrahepatic (n = 3) CPSVS were diagnosed invasively by catheterization, including test balloon occlusion of the shunt and simultaneous retrograde angiography, and treated by catheter interventions (n = 5) with partial (n = 2) and complete (n = 3) occlusion of CPSVS at a median age of 3.9 years (range 0.7-21). Congenital heart disease (CHD) was the most frequent associated organ manifestation (n = 5) followed by mild to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (n = 4), hepatopulmonary syndrome (n = 2), and portosystemic encephalopathy (n = 1). CHD was simple (n = 3) or complex type (n = 2). Three patients were untreated so far, because they were in excellent clinical condition at an age <1 year, refused treatment, or planned for later treatment.
CONCLUSIONS: Accurate invasive diagnosis of CPSVS with test balloon occlusion of the shunt is mandatory to depict the anatomic situation. Catheter interventional treatment of CPSVS offers a feasible and safe approach with complete or partial closure of the vascular malformation inducing potentially significant vascular growth of a former hypoplastic portal venous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The study aimed on the catheter interventional treatment of congenital portosystemic venous shunt (CPSVS) in childhood and the impact on vascular growth of hypoplastic portal veins. Clinical course and follow up of partial or complete closure of CPSVS are described.
BACKGROUND: CPSVS is a very rare vascular malformation of the portal venous drainage resulting in potentially life threatening abdominal, pulmonary, cerebral, and cardiac complications. The anatomic type, clinical course, and diagnosis must be determined for optimal management.
METHODS: Single centre case series.
RESULTS: Eight (6 female) children with extrahepatic (n = 5) and intrahepatic (n = 3) CPSVS were diagnosed invasively by catheterization, including test balloon occlusion of the shunt and simultaneous retrograde angiography, and treated by catheter interventions (n = 5) with partial (n = 2) and complete (n = 3) occlusion of CPSVS at a median age of 3.9 years (range 0.7-21). Congenital heart disease (CHD) was the most frequent associated organ manifestation (n = 5) followed by mild to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (n = 4), hepatopulmonary syndrome (n = 2), and portosystemic encephalopathy (n = 1). CHD was simple (n = 3) or complex type (n = 2). Three patients were untreated so far, because they were in excellent clinical condition at an age <1 year, refused treatment, or planned for later treatment.
CONCLUSIONS: Accurate invasive diagnosis of CPSVS with test balloon occlusion of the shunt is mandatory to depict the anatomic situation. Catheter interventional treatment of CPSVS offers a feasible and safe approach with complete or partial closure of the vascular malformation inducing potentially significant vascular growth of a former hypoplastic portal venous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
7 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
5 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 31 Jan 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2016
Deposited On:31 Jan 2017 09:21
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 11:51
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1522-1946
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.26362
PubMed ID:26715199

Download