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Febrile seizures in children during the Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic 2009/2010


Huber, B M; Trück, Johannes; Eich, G; Goetschel, P (2011). Febrile seizures in children during the Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic 2009/2010. Klinische Pädiatrie, 223(7):438-439.

Abstract

In children neurologic complications associated with influenza virus infection frequently present as febrile seizures with or without further signs of central nervous system involvement (Maricich SM et al., Pediatrics 2004; 114: e626–e633). Influenza A is a common viral cause of febrile seizures, however it remains unclear, if different types trigger seizures more likely than others. During the pandemic of the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus starting in April 2009, seizures were the most common neurologic complication among infected children (Ekstrand JJ et al., Ann Neurol 2010; 68: 762–766; Landau YE et al., Pediatr Neurol 2011; 44: 47–51). We therefore hypothesized, that the number and rate of febrile seizures must have increased during the pandemic months compared to previous years. We further investigated febrile seizure patients with suspected influenza A (H1N1) infection focusing on the difference between patients with positive vs. negative H1N1-test results.

Abstract

In children neurologic complications associated with influenza virus infection frequently present as febrile seizures with or without further signs of central nervous system involvement (Maricich SM et al., Pediatrics 2004; 114: e626–e633). Influenza A is a common viral cause of febrile seizures, however it remains unclear, if different types trigger seizures more likely than others. During the pandemic of the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus starting in April 2009, seizures were the most common neurologic complication among infected children (Ekstrand JJ et al., Ann Neurol 2010; 68: 762–766; Landau YE et al., Pediatr Neurol 2011; 44: 47–51). We therefore hypothesized, that the number and rate of febrile seizures must have increased during the pandemic months compared to previous years. We further investigated febrile seizure patients with suspected influenza A (H1N1) infection focusing on the difference between patients with positive vs. negative H1N1-test results.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2011
Deposited On:23 May 2019 10:04
Last Modified:23 May 2019 10:31
Publisher:Georg Thieme Verlag
ISSN:0300-8630
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0031-1283145
PubMed ID:21913162

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