Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Monopolising a statehood movement : Gorkhaland between authoritarian parties and "aware citizens"


Wenner, Miriam. Monopolising a statehood movement : Gorkhaland between authoritarian parties and "aware citizens". 2015, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

Monopolising  a  Statehood  Movement.  Gorkhaland  between  Authoritarian  Parties   and  ‘Aware  Citizens’   Miriam  Wenner  

 

Summary  (English)  

Movements  for  new  States  in  India  are  often  interpreted  as  a  sign  of  an  increasing   democratisation  and  decentralisation  of  political  power.  They  are  read  as  expressions  of  an   “aware  citizenry”  which  demands  its  rights  and  entitlements  from  the  state,  formulated  in   the  language  of  recognition  and  autonomy.  Contrary  to  such  positive  assumptions  this  thesis   contends  that  instead  of  enabling  a  greater  participation  of  the  population  in  governance,   movements  for  new  States  and  concessions  for  autonomy  can  entail  the  establishment  of   regional  competitive  authoritarian  regimes,  where  a  dominant  ethno-­‐regional  party   regularly  violates  principles  of  substantial  democracy.    

To  underline  this  argument  I  draw  on  insights  from  the  Gorkhaland  movement  in  Darjeeling.   Here,  the  largely  Nepali  speaking  population  demands  a  new  union  State  to  be  carved  out  of   northern  West  Bengal.  Succeeding  the  allegedly  corrupt  and  repressive  rule  of  the  Gorkha   National  Liberation  Front,  in  2007  a  new  party,  the  Gorkha  Liberation  Front  (GJM),  revived   the  long  standing  demand  for  statehood.  Under  the  slogans  of  “non-­‐violence”  and   “democracy”  the  GJM  also  proclaimed  a  new  political  culture  free  from  corruption  and   violent  repression.  Yet,  the  GJM  dominates  Darjeeling  while  allegedly  repressing  other   regional  parties  advocating  the  ethno-­‐regional  agenda.  The  party  is  now  the  sole  voice  of  the   Gorkhaland  movement  recognised  by  the  government.  This  raises  the  question  of  why  a   presumably  “aware  citizenry”  participating  in  a  movement  voiced  in  the  language  of   “democracy”  and  “non-­‐violence”  follows  a  party,  when  its  alleged  corrupt  and  repressive   practices  of  ruling  contradict  such  aspirations.  Why  did  the  succession  in  2007  and  the   revival  of  the  statehood  movement  not  entail  an  overall  regime  change  to  a  more   democratic  set-­‐up?  

This  study  has  two  aims.  First,  it  intends  to  account  for  statehood  movements’  effects  on   regional  political  regimes,  and  for  what  they  mean  to  those  involved.  It  seeks  to  dismantle   the  “movement”  paradigm  by  accounting  for  the  movements’  internal  fractures,  issues  of   representation,  inclusion  and  exclusion,  and  their  conflation  with  party  politics.  Defying   clear-­‐cut  distinctions  between  “movement”  and  “party”,  I  frame  the  Gorkhaland  movement   as  a  “party-­‐political  movement”  and  the  dominant  party  as  a  “movement  party”.  This   conceptualisation  allows  analysing  the  Gorkhaland  agitation  through  the  prism  of  party   political  contestations  enshrined  by  broader  state  policy.    

The  second  aim  of  this  study  is  to  analyse  the  dominance  of  an  ethno-­‐regional  party  in  the   statehood  movement  and  in  Darjeeling.  It  seeks  to  understand  how  the  political  authority  of   the  GJM  is  constructed.  To  do  so  it  explores  the  strategies  for  ruling  employed  by  the  party  



  1   and  its  leaders  and  contrasts  these  with  their  perception  and  evaluation  by  those  over   whom  they  seek  to  rule.    

Conceptionally,  I  draw  on  two  bodies  of  work:  studies  on  authoritarian  regimes  based  in   comparative  politics  and  anthropological  studies  on  the  construction  of  political  authority  in   South  Asia.  The  former  identify  repression,  co-­‐optation/patronage,  and  legitimacy  as  major   strategies  used  by  incumbents  to  maintain  their  power.  Anthropological  approaches   complement  these  theories  by  underlining  the  context-­‐specific  and  socially-­‐contested   conditions  for  ruling.  This  includes  their  capability  to  approach  the  considerations  and   constraints  of  the  ruled  in  supporting  or  resisting  an  incumbent.  Thereby  they  better   account  for  an  understanding  of  political  authority  as  deriving  from  a  qualitative,  contested,   and  dynamic  two-­‐sided  relationship  between  rulers  and  ruled.    

In  terms  of  methodology,  I  chose  a  qualitative  approach  grounded  in  the  constructivist   paradigm.  I  employed  multi-­‐sited  ethnography  to  account  for  the  multiple  sites  of  the   construction  of  political  authority  and  performances  of  politics  and  the  movement.  Aside   from  party  offices  and  sites  of  political  performance  such  as  public  meetings,  tea  plantations   were  of  particular  importance  as  contested  sites  for  political  support  in  regional  politics.    

My  study  identified  the  GJM’s  construction  and  reference  to  the  imaginative  geography  of   Gorkhaland,  the  leaders’  investment  in  his  reputation  as  a  strong,  generous,  and  honest   person,  the  establishment  of  resource  monopolies  over  the  developmental  state,  and  the   use  of  hard  repression  and  violence  against  rivals  as  major  strategies  for  ruling.  The   dominance  of  the  GJM  is  supported  by  the  regional  autonomous  council,  which   institutionalised  the  dependence-­‐relation  between  the  government  and  the  dominant  party.  

The  success  of  these  strategies  is  dependent  not  only  on  a  continuous  supply  of   governmental  patronage  resources  but  also  strongly  related  to  specific  historic  and  socio-­‐ economic  factors,  which  frame  their  reception  amongst  the  ruled.  Although  the  ruled   evaluate  leaders  according  to  different  moral  principles,  for  a  majority  pragmatic  concerns   and  the  longing  for  social  and  economic  security  pose  the  main  hindrances  to  speak  up   against  perceivably  “bad”  leaders.  This  renders  the  “aware  citizens”  in  Darjeeling  ultimately   silent  and  has  serious  implications  for  the  course,  meanings,  and  effects  of  the  statehood   movement.  

Instead  of  giving  people  a  voice,  the  Gorkhaland  movement  is  ultimately  detrimental  for  a   more  substantial  democracy  in  Darjeeling:  The  privileging  of  the  ethno-­‐regional  agenda   forecloses  alternative  ways  to  negotiate  citizens’  relations  with  the  state  and  the   identification  of  the  state  as  the  sole  enemy  of  people  obscures  the  roles  local  political   leaders  play  for  sustaining  the  very  conditions  against  which  people  protest.  Instead  of   uniting  the  population,  the  ruling  party’s  rhetoric  creates  distinctions  between  so-­‐called   Gorkhaland  lovers  and  enemies.  This  underlined  the  GJM’s  attempt  to  monopolise  the   movement  as  part  of  a  struggle  over  political  power,  while  denying  rivals  the  right  to   contend  for  the  common  cause.  Such  party  political  capture  eventually  weakens  the   movements’  programmatic  base.  



  2   Ultimately,  guided  by  pragmatism  and  material  aspirations,  a  movement  for  decentralisation   and  “democracy”  became  an  arena  to  acquire  and  struggle  over  material  resources.  For   many  followers,  paying  lip-­‐service  to  Gorkhaland  was  a  necessary  requirement  to  become   part  of  the  “winning  coalition”  of  a  party,  which  continues  to  draw  on  the  ethno-­‐regional   statehood  agenda  to  derive  its  legitimacy.    

 

Zusammenfassung  (Deutsch)  

Bewegungen  für  die  Gründung  neuer  Unionsstaaten  in  Indien  werden  oft  als  Zeichen  einer   zunehmenden  Demokratisierung  und  Dezentralisierung  politischer  Macht  gedeutet.  Sie   werden  als  Ausdruck  einer  „bewussten  Bürgerschaft“  gelesen,  die  ihre  Rechte  gegenüber   dem  Staat  mittels  einer  Sprache  von  Anerkennung  und  Autonomie  einfordern.  Im   Widerspruch  zu  solch  emanzipatorischen  Lesarten  zeigt  meine  Dissertation,  dass   Bewegungen  für  neue  Staaten  und  Autonomiekonzessionen  nicht  unbedingt  zu  verstärkter   politischer  Partizipation  der  Bevölkerung  führen,  sondern  stattdessen  die  Etablierung   kompetitiver  autoritärer  Regime  auf  der  regionalen  Ebene  fördern  können.  In  diesen   Regimen  verletzt  eine  dominante  ethno-­‐regionale  Partei  regelmäßig  und  systematisch   Prinzipien  substantieller  Demokratie.  

Um  dieses  Argument  zu  belegen,  beziehe  ich  mich  auf  die  Bewegung  für  einen  Unionsstaat   Gorkhaland  in  Darjeeling.  Hier  fordert  die  überwiegend  Nepali  sprechende  Bevölkerung  die   administrative  Abspaltung  von  Gebieten  des  nördlichen  West  Bengalen.  Im  Jahr  2007   beendete  dort  eine  neue  Partei,  die  Gorkha  Liberation  Front  (GJM),  die  als  korrupt  und   repressiv  kritisierte  Herrschaft  der  Gorkha  National  Liberation  Front  und  revitalisierte  die   seit  langem  bestehende  populäre  Bewegung  für  einen  neuen  Unionsstaat.  Unter  den   Schlagworten  „Gewaltlosigkeit“  und  „Demokratie“  proklamierte  die  GJM  eine  neue   politische  Kultur  frei  von  Korruption  und  gewaltvoller  Repression.  Dennoch  wurde  auch  ihr   bald  vorgeworfen,  Darjeeling  mittels  Repression  anderer  regionaler  Parteien,  die  ebenfalls   die  ethno-­‐regionale  Agenda  vertreten,  zu  beherrschen.  Auch  die  Regierung  erkennt  einzig   die  GJM  als  Sprachrohr  der  Bewegung  an.  Dies  wirft  die  Frage  auf,  warum  scheinbar   „bewusste  Bürger/innen“,  die  sich  in  einer  als  „demokratisch“  und  „gewaltfrei“   präsentierten  Bewegung  engagieren,  einer  Partei  folgen,  deren  augenscheinlich  korrupte   und  repressive  Herrschaftspraktiken  solchen  Prinzipien  widersprechen.  Warum  führten  der   Machtwechsel  2007  und  die  Wiederbelebung  der  Gorkhaland-­‐Bewegung  nicht  zu  einem   Wandel  des  politischen  Regimes  hin  zu  mehr  Demokratie?    

Vor  diesem  Hintergrund  verfolgt  die  vorliegende  Dissertation  zwei  Ziele:  Erstens  strebt  sie   an,  die  Auswirkungen  von  Bewegungen  für  neue  Staaten  auf  regionale  politische  Regimes   nachzuzeichnen  und  die  Bedeutungen  solcher  Bewegungen  für  die  Beteiligten  offen  zu   legen.  Sie  will  die  internen  Brüche,  Belange  von  Repräsentation,  Inklusion  und  Exklusion   innerhalb  von  sogenannten  Bewegungen  und  deren  Verschmelzung  mit  Parteienpolitik   aufdecken.  Dabei  werden  Unterscheidungen  zwischen  „Bewegung“  und  „Partei“  überbrückt,   indem  die  Gorkhaland-­‐Bewegung  als  „parteipolitische  Bewegung“  und  die  dominierende   Partei  als  „Bewegungs-­‐Partei“  konzeptionalisiert  werden.  Dies  erlaubt  es,  die  Bewegung  in  



  3   einem  Kontext  parteipolitischer  Kämpfe  -­‐  eingerahmt  durch  Politik  auf  anderen  Ebenen  -­‐  zu   betrachten.    

Das  zweite  Ziel  der  Studie  ist,  die  Dominanz  der  regierenden  ethno-­‐regionalen  Partei   innerhalb  der  Bewegung  sowie  in  Darjeeling  zu  analysieren.  Um  zu  verstehen,  wie  die   politische  Autorität  der  GJM  konstruiert  wird,  erkunde  ich  die  Herrschaftsstrategien  der   Partei  und  ihrer  Anführer/innen  und  kontrastiere  sie  mit  ihrer  Wahrnehmung  und   Beurteilung  seitens  derer,  über  die  Herrschaft  angestrebt  wird.  

Konzeptionell  beziehe  ich  mich  auf  Studien  zu  autoritären  Regimen  aus  der  vergleichenden   Politikwissenschaft  und  auf  anthropologische  Studien  zur  Konstruktion  politischer  Autorität   in  Südasien.  Die  ersteren  identifizieren  Repression,  Kooptation/Patronage  und  die  Schaffung   von  Legitimität  als  Hauptstrategien  von  Herrschenden  zum  Machterhalt.  Anthropologische   Ansätze  ergänzen  diese  Theorien,  indem  sie  betonen,  dass  die  Bedingungen  für  Herrschaft   immer  kontextspezifisch  und  sozial  umkämpft  sind.  So  werden  auch  die  Überlegungen  und   Einschränkungen  der  Beherrschten  berücksichtigt,  die  deren  Unterstützung  von  oder   Widerstand  gegen  einen  Herrscher  beeinflussen.  Politische  Autorität  wird  hier  demnach  als   Resultat  einer  qualitativen,  umkämpften  und  dynamischen  zweiseitigen  Beziehung  zwischen   Herrschenden  und  Beherrschten  begriffen.    

Methodisch  verfolgt  diese  Arbeit  eine  qualitativen,  konstruktivistisch  basierte   Herangehensweise.  Um  die  multiplen  Orte  der  Konstruktion  politischer  Autorität  einerseits   und  der  Performanz  von  Politik  und  der  Bewegung  andererseits  zu  betrachten,  verwende  ich   den  Ansatz  der  „multi-­‐sited  ethnography“.  Neben  Parteibüros  und  Orten  der  politischen   Performanz  (wie  etwa  öffentliche  Parteiveranstaltungen)  waren  insbesondere  Teeplantagen   als  Orte,  in  denen  Parteien  um  politische  Unterstützung  ringen,  von  besonderer  Bedeutung.    

Als  wichtigste  Herrschaftsstrategien  der  GJM  identifiziert  meine  Studie  die  Konstruktion  und   den  Bezug  der  Partei  auf  die  imaginative  Geographie  von  Gorkhaland,  die  Reputation  ihres   Anführers  als  stark,  grosszügig  und  ehrlich,  die  Etablierung  eines  Ressourcenmonopols  über   Entwicklungsprogramme  des  Staates  sowie  Repression  und  Gewalt  gegen  Rivalen.  Die   Dominanz  der  GJM  wird  dabei  von  einem  regionalen  autonomen  Council  unterstützt,   welcher  die  Abhängigkeitsbeziehungen  zwischen  der  West  Bengalischen  Regierung  und  der   dominierenden  Partei  institutionalisiert.    

Der  Erfolg  dieser  Strategien  hängt  nicht  nur  von  der  fortwährenden  Versorgung  mit   Patronage-­‐Gütern  der  Regierung  ab,  sondern  auch  von  spezifischen  historischen  und  sozio-­‐ ökonomischen  Kontextfaktoren,  welche  ihre  Wahrnehmung  unter  den  Beherrschten   beeinflussen.  Obwohl  die  Beherrschten  die  Herrschenden  anhand  unterschiedlicher   moralischer  Prinzipien  bewerten,  halten  pragmatische  Überlegungen  und  der  Wunsch  nach   sozialer  und  ökonomischer  Sicherheit  die  Mehrheit  von  ihnen  davon  ab,  als  „schlecht“   erachtete  Anführer  offen  zu  kritisieren.  Dies  macht  die  „bewussten  Bürger/innen“  in   Darjeeling  letztlich  schweigsam  und  hat  ernste  Auswirkungen  auf  den  Kurs,  die  Bedeutungen   und  die  Effekte  der  Gorkhaland-­‐Bewegung.    

Statt  den  Belangen  der  Menschen  eine  Stimme  zu  geben,  steht  die  Bewegung  damit  einer   Demokratisierung  in  Darjeeling  entgegen.  Das  Priorisieren  der  ethno-­‐regionalen  Agenda  



  4   schliesst  alternative  Möglichkeiten  für  die  Bürger  zur  Verhandlung  ihre  Beziehungen  zum   Staat  aus.  Mit  ihrer  Darstellung  der  West  Bengalischen  Regierung  als  Hauptfeind  der   Menschen  verschleiert  die  Gorkhaland-­‐Rhetorik  die  Rolle  von  lokalen  politischen  Führern,   die  genau  die  Bedingungen  aufrechterhalten,  gegen  die  die  Menschen  protestieren.  Statt  die   Bevölkerung  zu  vereinen,  spaltet  die  Rhetorik  der  regierenden  Partei  sie  in  sogenannte   Gorkhaland-­‐Befürworter  und  -­‐Gegner.  Dies  unterstreicht  den  Versuch  der  GJM,  in  ihrem   Kampf  um  politische  Macht  die  Bewegung  zu  monopolisieren  und  Rivalen  das  Recht,  für  das   gemeinsame  Ziel  zu  kämpfen,  zu  verwehren.  Eine  solche  parteipolitische  Vereinnahmung   der  Bewegung  schwächt  letztlich  deren  programmatische  Basis.    

Geleitet  von  Pragmatismus  und  materiellen  Ansprüchen,  wurde  eine  Bewegung  für   Dezentralisierung  und  „Demokratie“  zu  einer  Arena  des  Kampfes  über  materielle   Ressourcen.  Das  Lippenbekenntnis  zu  Gorkhaland  wurde  für  viele  zu  einer  notwendigen   Bedingung,  um  Teil  der  „Gewinnerkoalition“  der  regierenden  Partei  zu  bleiben.  Diese  bezieht   sich  weiterhin  auf  die  ethno-­‐regionale  Agenda,  um  ihre  Legitimität  gegenüber  den   Beherrschten  zu  stützen.  

 



  5

Abstract

Monopolising  a  Statehood  Movement.  Gorkhaland  between  Authoritarian  Parties   and  ‘Aware  Citizens’   Miriam  Wenner  

 

Summary  (English)  

Movements  for  new  States  in  India  are  often  interpreted  as  a  sign  of  an  increasing   democratisation  and  decentralisation  of  political  power.  They  are  read  as  expressions  of  an   “aware  citizenry”  which  demands  its  rights  and  entitlements  from  the  state,  formulated  in   the  language  of  recognition  and  autonomy.  Contrary  to  such  positive  assumptions  this  thesis   contends  that  instead  of  enabling  a  greater  participation  of  the  population  in  governance,   movements  for  new  States  and  concessions  for  autonomy  can  entail  the  establishment  of   regional  competitive  authoritarian  regimes,  where  a  dominant  ethno-­‐regional  party   regularly  violates  principles  of  substantial  democracy.    

To  underline  this  argument  I  draw  on  insights  from  the  Gorkhaland  movement  in  Darjeeling.   Here,  the  largely  Nepali  speaking  population  demands  a  new  union  State  to  be  carved  out  of   northern  West  Bengal.  Succeeding  the  allegedly  corrupt  and  repressive  rule  of  the  Gorkha   National  Liberation  Front,  in  2007  a  new  party,  the  Gorkha  Liberation  Front  (GJM),  revived   the  long  standing  demand  for  statehood.  Under  the  slogans  of  “non-­‐violence”  and   “democracy”  the  GJM  also  proclaimed  a  new  political  culture  free  from  corruption  and   violent  repression.  Yet,  the  GJM  dominates  Darjeeling  while  allegedly  repressing  other   regional  parties  advocating  the  ethno-­‐regional  agenda.  The  party  is  now  the  sole  voice  of  the   Gorkhaland  movement  recognised  by  the  government.  This  raises  the  question  of  why  a   presumably  “aware  citizenry”  participating  in  a  movement  voiced  in  the  language  of   “democracy”  and  “non-­‐violence”  follows  a  party,  when  its  alleged  corrupt  and  repressive   practices  of  ruling  contradict  such  aspirations.  Why  did  the  succession  in  2007  and  the   revival  of  the  statehood  movement  not  entail  an  overall  regime  change  to  a  more   democratic  set-­‐up?  

This  study  has  two  aims.  First,  it  intends  to  account  for  statehood  movements’  effects  on   regional  political  regimes,  and  for  what  they  mean  to  those  involved.  It  seeks  to  dismantle   the  “movement”  paradigm  by  accounting  for  the  movements’  internal  fractures,  issues  of   representation,  inclusion  and  exclusion,  and  their  conflation  with  party  politics.  Defying   clear-­‐cut  distinctions  between  “movement”  and  “party”,  I  frame  the  Gorkhaland  movement   as  a  “party-­‐political  movement”  and  the  dominant  party  as  a  “movement  party”.  This   conceptualisation  allows  analysing  the  Gorkhaland  agitation  through  the  prism  of  party   political  contestations  enshrined  by  broader  state  policy.    

The  second  aim  of  this  study  is  to  analyse  the  dominance  of  an  ethno-­‐regional  party  in  the   statehood  movement  and  in  Darjeeling.  It  seeks  to  understand  how  the  political  authority  of   the  GJM  is  constructed.  To  do  so  it  explores  the  strategies  for  ruling  employed  by  the  party  



  1   and  its  leaders  and  contrasts  these  with  their  perception  and  evaluation  by  those  over   whom  they  seek  to  rule.    

Conceptionally,  I  draw  on  two  bodies  of  work:  studies  on  authoritarian  regimes  based  in   comparative  politics  and  anthropological  studies  on  the  construction  of  political  authority  in   South  Asia.  The  former  identify  repression,  co-­‐optation/patronage,  and  legitimacy  as  major   strategies  used  by  incumbents  to  maintain  their  power.  Anthropological  approaches   complement  these  theories  by  underlining  the  context-­‐specific  and  socially-­‐contested   conditions  for  ruling.  This  includes  their  capability  to  approach  the  considerations  and   constraints  of  the  ruled  in  supporting  or  resisting  an  incumbent.  Thereby  they  better   account  for  an  understanding  of  political  authority  as  deriving  from  a  qualitative,  contested,   and  dynamic  two-­‐sided  relationship  between  rulers  and  ruled.    

In  terms  of  methodology,  I  chose  a  qualitative  approach  grounded  in  the  constructivist   paradigm.  I  employed  multi-­‐sited  ethnography  to  account  for  the  multiple  sites  of  the   construction  of  political  authority  and  performances  of  politics  and  the  movement.  Aside   from  party  offices  and  sites  of  political  performance  such  as  public  meetings,  tea  plantations   were  of  particular  importance  as  contested  sites  for  political  support  in  regional  politics.    

My  study  identified  the  GJM’s  construction  and  reference  to  the  imaginative  geography  of   Gorkhaland,  the  leaders’  investment  in  his  reputation  as  a  strong,  generous,  and  honest   person,  the  establishment  of  resource  monopolies  over  the  developmental  state,  and  the   use  of  hard  repression  and  violence  against  rivals  as  major  strategies  for  ruling.  The   dominance  of  the  GJM  is  supported  by  the  regional  autonomous  council,  which   institutionalised  the  dependence-­‐relation  between  the  government  and  the  dominant  party.  

The  success  of  these  strategies  is  dependent  not  only  on  a  continuous  supply  of   governmental  patronage  resources  but  also  strongly  related  to  specific  historic  and  socio-­‐ economic  factors,  which  frame  their  reception  amongst  the  ruled.  Although  the  ruled   evaluate  leaders  according  to  different  moral  principles,  for  a  majority  pragmatic  concerns   and  the  longing  for  social  and  economic  security  pose  the  main  hindrances  to  speak  up   against  perceivably  “bad”  leaders.  This  renders  the  “aware  citizens”  in  Darjeeling  ultimately   silent  and  has  serious  implications  for  the  course,  meanings,  and  effects  of  the  statehood   movement.  

Instead  of  giving  people  a  voice,  the  Gorkhaland  movement  is  ultimately  detrimental  for  a   more  substantial  democracy  in  Darjeeling:  The  privileging  of  the  ethno-­‐regional  agenda   forecloses  alternative  ways  to  negotiate  citizens’  relations  with  the  state  and  the   identification  of  the  state  as  the  sole  enemy  of  people  obscures  the  roles  local  political   leaders  play  for  sustaining  the  very  conditions  against  which  people  protest.  Instead  of   uniting  the  population,  the  ruling  party’s  rhetoric  creates  distinctions  between  so-­‐called   Gorkhaland  lovers  and  enemies.  This  underlined  the  GJM’s  attempt  to  monopolise  the   movement  as  part  of  a  struggle  over  political  power,  while  denying  rivals  the  right  to   contend  for  the  common  cause.  Such  party  political  capture  eventually  weakens  the   movements’  programmatic  base.  



  2   Ultimately,  guided  by  pragmatism  and  material  aspirations,  a  movement  for  decentralisation   and  “democracy”  became  an  arena  to  acquire  and  struggle  over  material  resources.  For   many  followers,  paying  lip-­‐service  to  Gorkhaland  was  a  necessary  requirement  to  become   part  of  the  “winning  coalition”  of  a  party,  which  continues  to  draw  on  the  ethno-­‐regional   statehood  agenda  to  derive  its  legitimacy.    

 

Zusammenfassung  (Deutsch)  

Bewegungen  für  die  Gründung  neuer  Unionsstaaten  in  Indien  werden  oft  als  Zeichen  einer   zunehmenden  Demokratisierung  und  Dezentralisierung  politischer  Macht  gedeutet.  Sie   werden  als  Ausdruck  einer  „bewussten  Bürgerschaft“  gelesen,  die  ihre  Rechte  gegenüber   dem  Staat  mittels  einer  Sprache  von  Anerkennung  und  Autonomie  einfordern.  Im   Widerspruch  zu  solch  emanzipatorischen  Lesarten  zeigt  meine  Dissertation,  dass   Bewegungen  für  neue  Staaten  und  Autonomiekonzessionen  nicht  unbedingt  zu  verstärkter   politischer  Partizipation  der  Bevölkerung  führen,  sondern  stattdessen  die  Etablierung   kompetitiver  autoritärer  Regime  auf  der  regionalen  Ebene  fördern  können.  In  diesen   Regimen  verletzt  eine  dominante  ethno-­‐regionale  Partei  regelmäßig  und  systematisch   Prinzipien  substantieller  Demokratie.  

Um  dieses  Argument  zu  belegen,  beziehe  ich  mich  auf  die  Bewegung  für  einen  Unionsstaat   Gorkhaland  in  Darjeeling.  Hier  fordert  die  überwiegend  Nepali  sprechende  Bevölkerung  die   administrative  Abspaltung  von  Gebieten  des  nördlichen  West  Bengalen.  Im  Jahr  2007   beendete  dort  eine  neue  Partei,  die  Gorkha  Liberation  Front  (GJM),  die  als  korrupt  und   repressiv  kritisierte  Herrschaft  der  Gorkha  National  Liberation  Front  und  revitalisierte  die   seit  langem  bestehende  populäre  Bewegung  für  einen  neuen  Unionsstaat.  Unter  den   Schlagworten  „Gewaltlosigkeit“  und  „Demokratie“  proklamierte  die  GJM  eine  neue   politische  Kultur  frei  von  Korruption  und  gewaltvoller  Repression.  Dennoch  wurde  auch  ihr   bald  vorgeworfen,  Darjeeling  mittels  Repression  anderer  regionaler  Parteien,  die  ebenfalls   die  ethno-­‐regionale  Agenda  vertreten,  zu  beherrschen.  Auch  die  Regierung  erkennt  einzig   die  GJM  als  Sprachrohr  der  Bewegung  an.  Dies  wirft  die  Frage  auf,  warum  scheinbar   „bewusste  Bürger/innen“,  die  sich  in  einer  als  „demokratisch“  und  „gewaltfrei“   präsentierten  Bewegung  engagieren,  einer  Partei  folgen,  deren  augenscheinlich  korrupte   und  repressive  Herrschaftspraktiken  solchen  Prinzipien  widersprechen.  Warum  führten  der   Machtwechsel  2007  und  die  Wiederbelebung  der  Gorkhaland-­‐Bewegung  nicht  zu  einem   Wandel  des  politischen  Regimes  hin  zu  mehr  Demokratie?    

Vor  diesem  Hintergrund  verfolgt  die  vorliegende  Dissertation  zwei  Ziele:  Erstens  strebt  sie   an,  die  Auswirkungen  von  Bewegungen  für  neue  Staaten  auf  regionale  politische  Regimes   nachzuzeichnen  und  die  Bedeutungen  solcher  Bewegungen  für  die  Beteiligten  offen  zu   legen.  Sie  will  die  internen  Brüche,  Belange  von  Repräsentation,  Inklusion  und  Exklusion   innerhalb  von  sogenannten  Bewegungen  und  deren  Verschmelzung  mit  Parteienpolitik   aufdecken.  Dabei  werden  Unterscheidungen  zwischen  „Bewegung“  und  „Partei“  überbrückt,   indem  die  Gorkhaland-­‐Bewegung  als  „parteipolitische  Bewegung“  und  die  dominierende   Partei  als  „Bewegungs-­‐Partei“  konzeptionalisiert  werden.  Dies  erlaubt  es,  die  Bewegung  in  



  3   einem  Kontext  parteipolitischer  Kämpfe  -­‐  eingerahmt  durch  Politik  auf  anderen  Ebenen  -­‐  zu   betrachten.    

Das  zweite  Ziel  der  Studie  ist,  die  Dominanz  der  regierenden  ethno-­‐regionalen  Partei   innerhalb  der  Bewegung  sowie  in  Darjeeling  zu  analysieren.  Um  zu  verstehen,  wie  die   politische  Autorität  der  GJM  konstruiert  wird,  erkunde  ich  die  Herrschaftsstrategien  der   Partei  und  ihrer  Anführer/innen  und  kontrastiere  sie  mit  ihrer  Wahrnehmung  und   Beurteilung  seitens  derer,  über  die  Herrschaft  angestrebt  wird.  

Konzeptionell  beziehe  ich  mich  auf  Studien  zu  autoritären  Regimen  aus  der  vergleichenden   Politikwissenschaft  und  auf  anthropologische  Studien  zur  Konstruktion  politischer  Autorität   in  Südasien.  Die  ersteren  identifizieren  Repression,  Kooptation/Patronage  und  die  Schaffung   von  Legitimität  als  Hauptstrategien  von  Herrschenden  zum  Machterhalt.  Anthropologische   Ansätze  ergänzen  diese  Theorien,  indem  sie  betonen,  dass  die  Bedingungen  für  Herrschaft   immer  kontextspezifisch  und  sozial  umkämpft  sind.  So  werden  auch  die  Überlegungen  und   Einschränkungen  der  Beherrschten  berücksichtigt,  die  deren  Unterstützung  von  oder   Widerstand  gegen  einen  Herrscher  beeinflussen.  Politische  Autorität  wird  hier  demnach  als   Resultat  einer  qualitativen,  umkämpften  und  dynamischen  zweiseitigen  Beziehung  zwischen   Herrschenden  und  Beherrschten  begriffen.    

Methodisch  verfolgt  diese  Arbeit  eine  qualitativen,  konstruktivistisch  basierte   Herangehensweise.  Um  die  multiplen  Orte  der  Konstruktion  politischer  Autorität  einerseits   und  der  Performanz  von  Politik  und  der  Bewegung  andererseits  zu  betrachten,  verwende  ich   den  Ansatz  der  „multi-­‐sited  ethnography“.  Neben  Parteibüros  und  Orten  der  politischen   Performanz  (wie  etwa  öffentliche  Parteiveranstaltungen)  waren  insbesondere  Teeplantagen   als  Orte,  in  denen  Parteien  um  politische  Unterstützung  ringen,  von  besonderer  Bedeutung.    

Als  wichtigste  Herrschaftsstrategien  der  GJM  identifiziert  meine  Studie  die  Konstruktion  und   den  Bezug  der  Partei  auf  die  imaginative  Geographie  von  Gorkhaland,  die  Reputation  ihres   Anführers  als  stark,  grosszügig  und  ehrlich,  die  Etablierung  eines  Ressourcenmonopols  über   Entwicklungsprogramme  des  Staates  sowie  Repression  und  Gewalt  gegen  Rivalen.  Die   Dominanz  der  GJM  wird  dabei  von  einem  regionalen  autonomen  Council  unterstützt,   welcher  die  Abhängigkeitsbeziehungen  zwischen  der  West  Bengalischen  Regierung  und  der   dominierenden  Partei  institutionalisiert.    

Der  Erfolg  dieser  Strategien  hängt  nicht  nur  von  der  fortwährenden  Versorgung  mit   Patronage-­‐Gütern  der  Regierung  ab,  sondern  auch  von  spezifischen  historischen  und  sozio-­‐ ökonomischen  Kontextfaktoren,  welche  ihre  Wahrnehmung  unter  den  Beherrschten   beeinflussen.  Obwohl  die  Beherrschten  die  Herrschenden  anhand  unterschiedlicher   moralischer  Prinzipien  bewerten,  halten  pragmatische  Überlegungen  und  der  Wunsch  nach   sozialer  und  ökonomischer  Sicherheit  die  Mehrheit  von  ihnen  davon  ab,  als  „schlecht“   erachtete  Anführer  offen  zu  kritisieren.  Dies  macht  die  „bewussten  Bürger/innen“  in   Darjeeling  letztlich  schweigsam  und  hat  ernste  Auswirkungen  auf  den  Kurs,  die  Bedeutungen   und  die  Effekte  der  Gorkhaland-­‐Bewegung.    

Statt  den  Belangen  der  Menschen  eine  Stimme  zu  geben,  steht  die  Bewegung  damit  einer   Demokratisierung  in  Darjeeling  entgegen.  Das  Priorisieren  der  ethno-­‐regionalen  Agenda  



  4   schliesst  alternative  Möglichkeiten  für  die  Bürger  zur  Verhandlung  ihre  Beziehungen  zum   Staat  aus.  Mit  ihrer  Darstellung  der  West  Bengalischen  Regierung  als  Hauptfeind  der   Menschen  verschleiert  die  Gorkhaland-­‐Rhetorik  die  Rolle  von  lokalen  politischen  Führern,   die  genau  die  Bedingungen  aufrechterhalten,  gegen  die  die  Menschen  protestieren.  Statt  die   Bevölkerung  zu  vereinen,  spaltet  die  Rhetorik  der  regierenden  Partei  sie  in  sogenannte   Gorkhaland-­‐Befürworter  und  -­‐Gegner.  Dies  unterstreicht  den  Versuch  der  GJM,  in  ihrem   Kampf  um  politische  Macht  die  Bewegung  zu  monopolisieren  und  Rivalen  das  Recht,  für  das   gemeinsame  Ziel  zu  kämpfen,  zu  verwehren.  Eine  solche  parteipolitische  Vereinnahmung   der  Bewegung  schwächt  letztlich  deren  programmatische  Basis.    

Geleitet  von  Pragmatismus  und  materiellen  Ansprüchen,  wurde  eine  Bewegung  für   Dezentralisierung  und  „Demokratie“  zu  einer  Arena  des  Kampfes  über  materielle   Ressourcen.  Das  Lippenbekenntnis  zu  Gorkhaland  wurde  für  viele  zu  einer  notwendigen   Bedingung,  um  Teil  der  „Gewinnerkoalition“  der  regierenden  Partei  zu  bleiben.  Diese  bezieht   sich  weiterhin  auf  die  ethno-­‐regionale  Agenda,  um  ihre  Legitimität  gegenüber  den   Beherrschten  zu  stützen.  

 



  5

Statistics

Downloads

540 downloads since deposited on 17 Feb 2017
323 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (monographical)
Referees:Müller-Böker Ulrike
Communities & Collections:UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:2015
Deposited On:17 Feb 2017 09:42
Last Modified:08 Feb 2019 15:14
Number of Pages:299
OA Status:Green
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=ebi01_prod010633377&context=L&vid=ZAD&search_scope=default_scope&tab=default_tab&lang=de_DE (Library Catalogue)

Download

Download PDF  'Monopolising a statehood movement : Gorkhaland between authoritarian parties and "aware citizens"'.
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 10MB