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Time to process information in working memory improves episodic memory


Souza, Alessandra S; Oberauer, Klaus (2017). Time to process information in working memory improves episodic memory. Journal of Memory & Language, 96:155-167.

Abstract

In simple-span tasks, participants encode items sequentially for immediate serial recall. Complex-span tasks are similar, except that items are interleaved with a distraction task. Whereas immediate memory is higher in simple than complex span, in tests of episodic long-term memory, better recall for words studied in complex than simple span has been observed (McCabe, 2008). This McCabe effect has been explained by assuming that distraction displace items from working memory, forcing people to covertly retrieve items after each distraction, thereby generating better episodic retrieval-cues than during simple span. Our experiments support an alternative hypothesis: individual words are attended to and processed longer in working memory in complex-span than in simple-span trials. We reduced the presentation rate of words in simple span, creating a “slow span” condition. Across four experiments, slow span improved episodic memory compared to simple span, and this benefit was larger than the McCabe effect.

Abstract

In simple-span tasks, participants encode items sequentially for immediate serial recall. Complex-span tasks are similar, except that items are interleaved with a distraction task. Whereas immediate memory is higher in simple than complex span, in tests of episodic long-term memory, better recall for words studied in complex than simple span has been observed (McCabe, 2008). This McCabe effect has been explained by assuming that distraction displace items from working memory, forcing people to covertly retrieve items after each distraction, thereby generating better episodic retrieval-cues than during simple span. Our experiments support an alternative hypothesis: individual words are attended to and processed longer in working memory in complex-span than in simple-span trials. We reduced the presentation rate of words in simple span, creating a “slow span” condition. Across four experiments, slow span improved episodic memory compared to simple span, and this benefit was larger than the McCabe effect.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:October 2017
Deposited On:28 Aug 2017 10:56
Last Modified:17 Nov 2019 06:46
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0749-596X
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2017.07.002
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_149193
  • : Project TitleThe Role of Rehearsal in Working Memory

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