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What matters, parental or child perceptions of physical activity facilities? A prospective parent-child study explaining physical activity and body fat among children


Horodyska, Karolina; Boberska, Monika; Knoll, Nina; Scholz, Urte; Radtke, Theda; Liszewska, Natalia; Luszczynska, Aleksandra (2018). What matters, parental or child perceptions of physical activity facilities? A prospective parent-child study explaining physical activity and body fat among children. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 34:39-46.

Abstract

Objectives: Research explaining childhood obesity has been usually focused on cognitive and behavioral predictors assessed in parents only or in children only. In contrast, the dyadic approach allows to evaluate how parental and child predictors operate together to explain child physical activity (PA) and body fat. This study investigated relationships among: (1) parental and child perceptions of accessibility and safety of exercise facilities for children, (2) parental and child PA, and (3) parental and child body fat percentage.

Design: A prospective and dyadic study with two measurement points was conducted. The follow up (Time 2) took place at 7–8-month after the baseline (Time 1).

Methods: Data were collected among 922 dyads of parents (mean age 35.97 years old; 83.9% women) and children (aged 6–11; M = 8.42, 52% girls). Parents and children reported safety and accessibility perceptions (Time 1) and PA (Time 1 and 2). Parental and child body fat were measured objectively (Time 1 and 2).

Results: Path analysis showed that parental perceptions of accessibility of PA facilities for children (Time 1) predicted child body fat and PA (Time 2). The associations were significant in a model accounting for longitudinal and cross-sectional associations between parental and child body fat and PA, controlling for age and gender of parents and children. Similar patterns of associations were found in the subsamples of dyads with children with normal body weight and with children with overweight/obesity.

Conclusions: Parental, not child perceptions of accessibility of PA facilities predicted child PA and body fat.

Abstract

Objectives: Research explaining childhood obesity has been usually focused on cognitive and behavioral predictors assessed in parents only or in children only. In contrast, the dyadic approach allows to evaluate how parental and child predictors operate together to explain child physical activity (PA) and body fat. This study investigated relationships among: (1) parental and child perceptions of accessibility and safety of exercise facilities for children, (2) parental and child PA, and (3) parental and child body fat percentage.

Design: A prospective and dyadic study with two measurement points was conducted. The follow up (Time 2) took place at 7–8-month after the baseline (Time 1).

Methods: Data were collected among 922 dyads of parents (mean age 35.97 years old; 83.9% women) and children (aged 6–11; M = 8.42, 52% girls). Parents and children reported safety and accessibility perceptions (Time 1) and PA (Time 1 and 2). Parental and child body fat were measured objectively (Time 1 and 2).

Results: Path analysis showed that parental perceptions of accessibility of PA facilities for children (Time 1) predicted child body fat and PA (Time 2). The associations were significant in a model accounting for longitudinal and cross-sectional associations between parental and child body fat and PA, controlling for age and gender of parents and children. Similar patterns of associations were found in the subsamples of dyads with children with normal body weight and with children with overweight/obesity.

Conclusions: Parental, not child perceptions of accessibility of PA facilities predicted child PA and body fat.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:23 Nov 2017 14:52
Last Modified:29 Jul 2018 06:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1878-5476
Additional Information:Supplementary data related to this article can be found at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.09.007
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.09.007
Project Information:
  • : FunderNational Science Centre, Poland
  • : Grant IDNN 106 012240
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderNational Science Centre, Poland
  • : Grant IDDEC-2016/20/T/HS6/00020
  • : Project Title

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