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Skin test reactivity to hymenoptera venom after venom immunotherapy correlates inversely with the IgG/IgE ratio


Saulite, Ieva; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Guenova, Emmanuella; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Glatz, Martin (2017). Skin test reactivity to hymenoptera venom after venom immunotherapy correlates inversely with the IgG/IgE ratio. International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 174(3-4):190-199.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Skin test reactivity to hymenoptera venom and venom-specific IgE are important for diagnosing venom allergy and deciding on the appropriate allergen for venom immunotherapy (VIT). Longitudinal data on skin test reactivity during VIT and their correlation with venom-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG are scarce.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed shifts in skin test reactivity and serum levels of venom-specific IgE and IgG in patients allergic to hymenoptera venom before the initiation of VIT with ultrarush therapy and after ≥3 years of VIT.
RESULTS: Fifty-four patients received ultrarush desensitization and subsequent VIT with wasp venom, 26 with honeybee venom, and 8 with both wasp and honeybee venom. Hymenoptera-specific skin test reactivity decreased during VIT in most patients, and became negative in 8% of the wasp-allergic patients and in 25% of the honeybee-allergic patients. Serum levels of venom-specific IgE positively correlated to skin test reactivity before VIT, but did not change significantly during VIT. IgG serum levels and the IgG/IgE ratio increased during VIT in most patients. A high IgG/IgE ratio correlated with low skin test reactivity after ≥3 years of VIT.
CONCLUSIONS: The correlation between a high venom-specific IgG/IgE ratio and low skin test reactivity after VIT may be interesting for future investigations that assess its role as a potential marker for VIT efficacy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Skin test reactivity to hymenoptera venom and venom-specific IgE are important for diagnosing venom allergy and deciding on the appropriate allergen for venom immunotherapy (VIT). Longitudinal data on skin test reactivity during VIT and their correlation with venom-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG are scarce.
METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed shifts in skin test reactivity and serum levels of venom-specific IgE and IgG in patients allergic to hymenoptera venom before the initiation of VIT with ultrarush therapy and after ≥3 years of VIT.
RESULTS: Fifty-four patients received ultrarush desensitization and subsequent VIT with wasp venom, 26 with honeybee venom, and 8 with both wasp and honeybee venom. Hymenoptera-specific skin test reactivity decreased during VIT in most patients, and became negative in 8% of the wasp-allergic patients and in 25% of the honeybee-allergic patients. Serum levels of venom-specific IgE positively correlated to skin test reactivity before VIT, but did not change significantly during VIT. IgG serum levels and the IgG/IgE ratio increased during VIT in most patients. A high IgG/IgE ratio correlated with low skin test reactivity after ≥3 years of VIT.
CONCLUSIONS: The correlation between a high venom-specific IgG/IgE ratio and low skin test reactivity after VIT may be interesting for future investigations that assess its role as a potential marker for VIT efficacy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Hymenoptera venom allergy, Immunoglobulin E, Immunoglobulin G, Skin test, Venom immunotherapy
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:14 Dec 2017 16:35
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 09:35
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1018-2438
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000481255
PubMed ID:29130986

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