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Hypothermia does not influence liver damage and function in a porcine polytrauma model


Eschbach, D; Horst, K; Sassen, M; Andruszkow, J; Mohr, J; Debus, F; Vogt, N; Steinfeldt, T; Hildebrand, F; Schöller, K; Uhl, E; Wulf, H; Ruchholtz, S; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Frink, M (2018). Hypothermia does not influence liver damage and function in a porcine polytrauma model. Technology and Health Care, 26(2):209-221.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies revealed evidence that induced hypothermia attenuates ischemic organ injuries after severe trauma. In the present study, the effect of hypothermia on liver damage was investigated in a porcine long term model of multi-system injury, consisting of blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, musculoskeletal injury, and hemorrhagic shock
METHODS: In 30 pigs, a standardized polytrauma including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, musculoskeletal injury, and hemorrhagic shock of 45% of total blood volume was induced. Following trauma, hypothermia of 33∘C was induced for 12 h and intensive care treatment was evaluated for 48 h. As outcome parameters, we assessed liver function and serum transaminase levels as well as a histopathological analysis of tissue samples. A further 10 animals served as controls.
RESULTS: Serum transaminase levels were increased at the end of the observation period following hypothermia without reaching statistical significance compared to normothermic groups. Liver function was preserved (p⩽ 0.05) after the rewarming period in hypothermic animals but showed no difference at the end of the observation period. In H&E staining, cell death was slightly increased hypothermic animals and caspase-3 staining displayed tendency towards more apoptosis in hypothermic group as well.
CONCLUSIONS: Induction of hypothermia could not significantly improve hepatic damage during the first 48 h following major trauma. Further studies focusing on multi-organ failure including a longer observation period are required to illuminate the impact of hypothermia on hepatic function in multiple trauma patients.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies revealed evidence that induced hypothermia attenuates ischemic organ injuries after severe trauma. In the present study, the effect of hypothermia on liver damage was investigated in a porcine long term model of multi-system injury, consisting of blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, musculoskeletal injury, and hemorrhagic shock
METHODS: In 30 pigs, a standardized polytrauma including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, musculoskeletal injury, and hemorrhagic shock of 45% of total blood volume was induced. Following trauma, hypothermia of 33∘C was induced for 12 h and intensive care treatment was evaluated for 48 h. As outcome parameters, we assessed liver function and serum transaminase levels as well as a histopathological analysis of tissue samples. A further 10 animals served as controls.
RESULTS: Serum transaminase levels were increased at the end of the observation period following hypothermia without reaching statistical significance compared to normothermic groups. Liver function was preserved (p⩽ 0.05) after the rewarming period in hypothermic animals but showed no difference at the end of the observation period. In H&E staining, cell death was slightly increased hypothermic animals and caspase-3 staining displayed tendency towards more apoptosis in hypothermic group as well.
CONCLUSIONS: Induction of hypothermia could not significantly improve hepatic damage during the first 48 h following major trauma. Further studies focusing on multi-organ failure including a longer observation period are required to illuminate the impact of hypothermia on hepatic function in multiple trauma patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:ypothermia, liver laceration, porcine animal model, trauma model
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:12 Dec 2017 17:22
Last Modified:25 Apr 2018 01:01
Publisher:I O S Press
ISSN:0928-7329
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3233/THC-171043
PubMed ID:28968251

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