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Impact of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) on growth of colorectal liver metastases


Kambakamba, Patryk; Linecker, Michael; Schneider, Marcel; Reiner, Cäcilia S; Nguyen-Kim, Thi Dan Linh; Limani, Perparim; Romic, Ivan; Figueras, Joan; Petrowsky, Henrik; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Lesurtel, Mickaël (2018). Impact of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) on growth of colorectal liver metastases. Surgery, 163(2):311-317.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy induces an unprecedented liver hypertrophy and enables resection of otherwise unresectable liver tumors. The effect of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy on tumor proliferation, however, remains a concern. This study investigated the impact of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy on growth of colorectal metastases in mice and in humans. METHODS The effect of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy and 90% portal vein ligation on colorectal liver and lung metastases was investigated in mice. In vivo tumor progression was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and survival experiments. The effects of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy, portal vein ligation, and control sera on cultures of several colorectal cancer cell lines (MC38 and CT26) were tested in vitro. Additionally, the international associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy registry enabled us to identify patients with remaining tumor in the future liver remnant after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy stage 1. RESULTS Two and 3 weeks after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy stage 1, portal vein ligation, or sham surgery, liver magnetic resonance images showed similar numbers (P=.14/0.82), sizes (P=.45/0.98), and growth kinetics (P=.58/0.68) of intrahepatic tumor. Tumor growth was not different between the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy and portal vein ligation groups after completion of stage 2. Median survival after tumor cell injection was similar after sham surgery (36 days; 95% confidence interval; 27-57 days), completion of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (42 days; 95% confidence interval; 35-49 days), and portal vein ligation (39 days; 95% confidence interval; 34-43 days, P=.237). Progression of pulmonary metastases and in vitro cell proliferation were comparable among groups. Observations in humans failed to identify any accelerated tumor growth in the future liver remnant within the regenerative phase after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy stage 1. CONCLUSION The accelerated regeneration process associated with associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy does not appear to enhance growth of colorectal metastases.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy induces an unprecedented liver hypertrophy and enables resection of otherwise unresectable liver tumors. The effect of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy on tumor proliferation, however, remains a concern. This study investigated the impact of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy on growth of colorectal metastases in mice and in humans. METHODS The effect of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy and 90% portal vein ligation on colorectal liver and lung metastases was investigated in mice. In vivo tumor progression was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and survival experiments. The effects of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy, portal vein ligation, and control sera on cultures of several colorectal cancer cell lines (MC38 and CT26) were tested in vitro. Additionally, the international associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy registry enabled us to identify patients with remaining tumor in the future liver remnant after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy stage 1. RESULTS Two and 3 weeks after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy stage 1, portal vein ligation, or sham surgery, liver magnetic resonance images showed similar numbers (P=.14/0.82), sizes (P=.45/0.98), and growth kinetics (P=.58/0.68) of intrahepatic tumor. Tumor growth was not different between the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy and portal vein ligation groups after completion of stage 2. Median survival after tumor cell injection was similar after sham surgery (36 days; 95% confidence interval; 27-57 days), completion of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (42 days; 95% confidence interval; 35-49 days), and portal vein ligation (39 days; 95% confidence interval; 34-43 days, P=.237). Progression of pulmonary metastases and in vitro cell proliferation were comparable among groups. Observations in humans failed to identify any accelerated tumor growth in the future liver remnant within the regenerative phase after associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy stage 1. CONCLUSION The accelerated regeneration process associated with associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy does not appear to enhance growth of colorectal metastases.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Surgery
Language:English
Date:February 2018
Deposited On:26 Jan 2018 08:30
Last Modified:19 Aug 2018 12:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0039-6060
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2017.10.036
PubMed ID:29248180
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P3_128475
  • : Project TitleReversible portal vein embolization for safer liver surgery and transplantation

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