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Implicit theory of writing ability : relationship to metacognitive strategy knowledge and strategy use in academic writing


Karlen, Yves; Compagnoni, Miriam (2017). Implicit theory of writing ability : relationship to metacognitive strategy knowledge and strategy use in academic writing. Psychology Learning & Teaching, 16(1):47-63.

Abstract

Implicit theories about the nature of human attributes as either malleable or fixed influence how people perceive knowledge and approach different tasks. Two studies explored the relationship between implicit theory of writing ability, metacognitive strategy knowledge (MSK), and strategy use in the context of academic writing. The pre-study with N = 51 university students revealed a significant correlation between students’ implicit theories and their MSK. Self-reported quality and diversity of strategy use, assessed by open-ended questions, were not significantly associated with students’ implicit theories. Expanding strategy use measures, study 2 (N = 133) found significant correlations between a more malleable theory and more frequent use of metacognitive strategies. Confirming the results of the pre-study, the results of study 2 showed that a more malleable theory of writing ability was directly associated with higher MSK. In sum, the results illustrate the importance of linking implicit theories to self-regulated learning.

Abstract

Implicit theories about the nature of human attributes as either malleable or fixed influence how people perceive knowledge and approach different tasks. Two studies explored the relationship between implicit theory of writing ability, metacognitive strategy knowledge (MSK), and strategy use in the context of academic writing. The pre-study with N = 51 university students revealed a significant correlation between students’ implicit theories and their MSK. Self-reported quality and diversity of strategy use, assessed by open-ended questions, were not significantly associated with students’ implicit theories. Expanding strategy use measures, study 2 (N = 133) found significant correlations between a more malleable theory and more frequent use of metacognitive strategies. Confirming the results of the pre-study, the results of study 2 showed that a more malleable theory of writing ability was directly associated with higher MSK. In sum, the results illustrate the importance of linking implicit theories to self-regulated learning.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:09 Jan 2018 16:13
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:08
ISSN:1475-7257
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1475725716682887

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