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Mid- to long-term results of total ankle replacement in patients with haemophilic arthropathy: A 10-year follow-up


Eckers, F; Bauer, D E; Hingsammer, A; Sutter, R; Brand, B; Viehöfer, A; Wirth, S H (2018). Mid- to long-term results of total ankle replacement in patients with haemophilic arthropathy: A 10-year follow-up. Haemophilia, 24(2):307-315.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Haemophilic ankle arthropathy is caused by recurrent spontaneous joint haemorrhaging and leads to pain, deformity and loss of function. In the presence of advanced articular deterioration, therapeutic options are confined to either arthroplasty or arthrodesis, the latter still being referred to as the procedure of choice. However, total ankle replacement (TAR) has recently gained acceptance as an alternative. AIM To investigate the mid- to long-term results of TAR in haemophilic ankle arthropathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventeen TARs in 14 male patients (mean age: 43 years [range, 27.4-57.6]), implanted between 1998 and 2012, were retrospectively analysed. Implant survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Haemophilic/viral status, complications and revision surgeries were recorded. Follow-up assessment of 12 TARs was performed 9.6 years (range, 3.3-17.8) postoperatively, including clinical examination, pain and satisfaction scales, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score, and the SF-36. Radiographic evaluation of pre- and follow-up radiographs was conducted. RESULTS Estimated implant survival was 94% at 5, 85% at 10 and 70% at 15 years, respectively. Three cases required revision surgery. At follow-up, 9.6 years (range, 3.3-17.8) postoperatively, the level of satisfaction was 76% (range, 50-100) and of pain 2/10 (range, 0-6) on the VAS. Range of motion had increased significantly (P = .037). The SF-36 summary scores were comparable to those of a matched standard population. The AOFAS hindfoot score averaged 81 points (range, 73-90). All radiographs revealed component loosening or periprosthetic radiolucency. CONCLUSION Total ankle replacement in the presence of advanced haemophilic arthropathy is a viable treatment option with favourable mid-/long-term results, maintaining mobility of the ankle joint.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Haemophilic ankle arthropathy is caused by recurrent spontaneous joint haemorrhaging and leads to pain, deformity and loss of function. In the presence of advanced articular deterioration, therapeutic options are confined to either arthroplasty or arthrodesis, the latter still being referred to as the procedure of choice. However, total ankle replacement (TAR) has recently gained acceptance as an alternative. AIM To investigate the mid- to long-term results of TAR in haemophilic ankle arthropathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventeen TARs in 14 male patients (mean age: 43 years [range, 27.4-57.6]), implanted between 1998 and 2012, were retrospectively analysed. Implant survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Haemophilic/viral status, complications and revision surgeries were recorded. Follow-up assessment of 12 TARs was performed 9.6 years (range, 3.3-17.8) postoperatively, including clinical examination, pain and satisfaction scales, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score, and the SF-36. Radiographic evaluation of pre- and follow-up radiographs was conducted. RESULTS Estimated implant survival was 94% at 5, 85% at 10 and 70% at 15 years, respectively. Three cases required revision surgery. At follow-up, 9.6 years (range, 3.3-17.8) postoperatively, the level of satisfaction was 76% (range, 50-100) and of pain 2/10 (range, 0-6) on the VAS. Range of motion had increased significantly (P = .037). The SF-36 summary scores were comparable to those of a matched standard population. The AOFAS hindfoot score averaged 81 points (range, 73-90). All radiographs revealed component loosening or periprosthetic radiolucency. CONCLUSION Total ankle replacement in the presence of advanced haemophilic arthropathy is a viable treatment option with favourable mid-/long-term results, maintaining mobility of the ankle joint.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2018
Deposited On:16 Jan 2018 15:18
Last Modified:31 Mar 2018 01:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1351-8216
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/hae.13386
PubMed ID:29271607

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