Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

A cohort of 17 patients with kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14: expansion of the clinical and mutational spectrum and description of the natural history


Abstract

PurposeIn 2012 we reported in six individuals a clinical condition almost indistinguishable from PLOD1-kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (PLOD1-kEDS), caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14, and characterized by progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss in addition to connective tissue abnormalities such as joint hypermobility and hyperelastic skin. FKBP14 is an ER-resident protein belonging to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases); it catalyzes the folding of type III collagen and interacts with type III, type VI, and type X collagens. Only nine affected individuals have been reported to date.MethodsWe report on a cohort of 17 individuals with FKBP14-kEDS and the follow-up of three previously reported patients, and provide an extensive overview of the disorder and its natural history based on clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetics data.ResultsBased on the frequency of the clinical features of 23 patients from the present and previous cohorts, we define major and minor features of FKBP14-kEDS. We show that myopathy is confirmed by histology and muscle imaging only in some patients, and that hearing impairment is predominantly sensorineural and may not be present in all individuals.ConclusionOur data further support the extensive clinical overlap with PLOD1-kEDS and show that vascular complications are rare manifestations of FKBP14-kEDS.

Abstract

PurposeIn 2012 we reported in six individuals a clinical condition almost indistinguishable from PLOD1-kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (PLOD1-kEDS), caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14, and characterized by progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss in addition to connective tissue abnormalities such as joint hypermobility and hyperelastic skin. FKBP14 is an ER-resident protein belonging to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases); it catalyzes the folding of type III collagen and interacts with type III, type VI, and type X collagens. Only nine affected individuals have been reported to date.MethodsWe report on a cohort of 17 individuals with FKBP14-kEDS and the follow-up of three previously reported patients, and provide an extensive overview of the disorder and its natural history based on clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetics data.ResultsBased on the frequency of the clinical features of 23 patients from the present and previous cohorts, we define major and minor features of FKBP14-kEDS. We show that myopathy is confirmed by histology and muscle imaging only in some patients, and that hearing impairment is predominantly sensorineural and may not be present in all individuals.ConclusionOur data further support the extensive clinical overlap with PLOD1-kEDS and show that vascular complications are rare manifestations of FKBP14-kEDS.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

9 downloads since deposited on 29 Jan 2018
9 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2018
Deposited On:29 Jan 2018 15:56
Last Modified:01 Mar 2018 01:55
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1098-3600
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/gim.2017.70
PubMed ID:28617417

Download

Download PDF  'A cohort of 17 patients with kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14: expansion of the clinical and mutational spectrum and description of the natural history'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)